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Turning the tables: “inclusion is … making a new space”

22 Jun

The birth of Islam created a new space where non-Arabs and the lower strata of the tribes were included.

The Arabic text closest to the entrance to the first gallery of the Ko rātou, ko tātou | On other-ness, on us-ness exhibition (See details here or go to the blog introducing this exhibition) that was on show at NorthArt, Auckland, reads as “first house” (avvala baytin). Below this was the sentence from the Qur’an:
“Indeed, the first House [of worship] established for humanity was that at Makkah [Bakka] – blessed and a guidance for the worlds.”
The Qur’an, 3:96

Left to Right: Wave (detail), custom-made water tank by Jeff Thomson Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level (2018) by Ursula Christel. Courtesy the artist and Mokopōpaki Acrylic, gesso, printed perspex, metal lugs, pencil, sealant on board (99 x 61cm), plastic spirit level (6 x 61cm). Gavin Chilcott Pilgrimage to Mecca 50 x 70 cm. Framed pastel on paper. Courtesy: John Perry. Arabic text above reads: "first house (avvala baytin)"

Left to Right: Wave (detail), custom-made water tank by Jeff Thomson (link to a discussion of this work); Arabic text above reads: “first house (avvala baytin)”; Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level (2018) by Ursula Christel. Courtesy the artist and Mokopōpaki Acrylic, gesso, printed perspex, metal lugs, graphite, sealant on board (99 x 61cm), plastic spirit level (6 x 61cm);
Gavin Chilcott Pilgrimage to Mecca, 50 x 70 cm. Framed pastel on paper. Courtesy: John Perry.

Ever since the 1980s, when I first started reading about Islam, coming from a Roman Catholic background myself, I was struck by the concept of the qibla because while Rome is important, Catholics around the world, do not face a specific location while in prayer. The significance of this as I viewed it was that the Prophet Muhammad had envisioned a worldwide religion – of all cultures around the world facing the same location, as a daily sign of a shared global focus. Then while engaged in research for this exhibition I discovered that the text from the Qur’an refers to a change of direction, because previously the Prophet’s followers had faced Jerusalem when they prayed which was also the Jewish custom, and now they were to face Mecca (also known as Bakka or Bekka, the name of the area, or Makkah. See 2:144 which speaks of changing the qibla to Mecca).

For me as a Bahai, this brought in the concept of progressive revelation, the idea that all religions are the same religion (with the same God), and the variations are in relation to culture and history. So I saw the change as indicative of the evolution of Islam, even during the time of the Prophet Muhammad. It also explained for me why The Dome of the Rock built in Jerusalem in 691–92 at the order of Umayyad Caliph Abd al-Malik could have been built, although there is no clear record of its initial purpose. At the time, Jerusalem was a holy city for Jews and Christians. This building rivalled the Christian buildings, transforming the best aspects of current Byzantine architecture into a new form. The 1022-23 rebuilt Dome of the Rock has texts on the walls referring to Islamic teachings about Jesus. Today it is one of the oldest extant works of Islamic architecture, protects the rock believed to bear the imprint of the Prophet Muhammad’s foot, and is an icon and influence on Islamic architecture.

Foreground: New Space / Takawaenga, 2020, by Ursula Christel.
Left to Right: Wake, custom-made water tank, by Jeff Thomson; Arabic text reads: “first house”; Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level, 2018, by Ursula Christel. Courtesy the artist and Mokopōpaki; Pilgrimage to Mecca, 1986, by Gavin Chilcott.

Ursula Christel’s floor piece, made for this exhibition, New Space / Takawaenga, is the result of her research inspired by the concept of inclusion and the geometry of the floor plan of the Dome of the Rock. This Islamic holy place stands on a site that is sacred to Jews, Christians and Muslims – three of the Abrahamic religions.

Ko rātou, ko tātou | On Other-ness, on us-ness NorthArt, Northcote, Auckland, Aotearoa | New Zealand curated by Salama Moata McNamara + Sonja van Kerkhoff opened 16 March 2020. Closed on March 22nd. New Zealand went into lockdown on 26 March and so the exhibition remains behind closed doors until ... Some artworks were responses to the 2019 Christchurch mosque massacres while others are recontexualisations in relation to the Qur'an and the diverse cultures and histories of Islamic worlds.

Foreground: New Space / Takawaenga, 2020, by Ursula Christel.
Left to Right: Wake, custom-made silkscreened water tank, by Jeff Thomson; Arabic text “first house” (avvala baytin); Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level by Ursula Christel. Courtesy the artist and Mokopōpaki; Pilgrimage to Mecca by Gavin Chilcott; From the Eros and Psyche series (111), 1966/67, gouache on silk, by Joanna Margaret Paul, Courtesy M Paul;
two untitled corrugated iron sculptures by Jeff Thomson.

Like the Dome of the Rock, Christel’s, New Space / Takawaenga, is based on polygonal structures – of lines and repetitions of forms creating illusory space/s. Christel’s ‘new space’ is conceptualized not only in the multi-layered sight lines heading off at diverse angles across the space of the gallery but the stark checkered tiles also pull the eye to the pivot.

New Space / Takawaenga, 2020, by Ursula Christel. re-purposed wooden table (dia. 118 cm), 4 table legs (H: 46 cm), vinyl flooring, 3 mm acrylic sheets (83 x 83cm), glass chess board (38 x 38cm), ceramic tile (20 x 20cm), composite board (dia. 65cm), jute, LED lights.

This axis is created by four upcycled arabesque table legs. One of the four legs, has a disability – there is a piece missing. Christel told me that one in four people have a disability of some sort.

The architectural references connect to her other work in the same gallery space, Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level, which also features circles within squares and vice versa.

Detail: Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level by Ursula Christel.

This painting features a translucent image of her son who was born with Angelman syndrome, inside a circle superimposed over an image of Leonardo’s Vitruvian Man. Leonardo’s ‘ideal man’ is a faded shadow within a larger circle while Christel’s son sits up in a wheelchair with his arms held up and elbows bent outwards, a gesture that I — having met him a few times — recognize as meaning he is happy and excited.
One of the wheels rests on the outer of the two circles as if to demonstrate that the circle around him is a bubble that moves with him. That this is his world, who he is, and he belongs. This repudiates the idea of the ideal human in Leonardo’s image. Both images of the self utilize the circle to symbolize one’s reach – one’s place in the cosmos.

Left to Right: Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level by Ursula Christel;
Pilgrimage to Mecca, 1986, by Gavin Chilcott.

The six horizontal bars or steps in Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level, form part of a frame around the image of Christel’s son, as if to show that the wheelchair has made it up those levels, or to pose the question of why the wheelchair had to face those barriers? The numbers reminded me of times I have helped disabled friends by counting the steps with them. The bright yellow spirit level laid at the top poses the question: where is the level playing field in this?

Gavin Chilcott, Pilgrimage to Mecca, 50 x 70 cm. Framed pastel on paper.
Courtesy: John Perry.

Next to this work was the Gavin Chilcott pastel, Pilgrimage to Mecca, a fortuitous last minute addition to the exhibition. Here the subject matter is the qibla (‘the first house’) where the expanding ripples of energy-filled lines point to the spiritual – of prayer that flows from and around the qibla. Only Muslims may enter space around the Kaaba, a building at the center of Islam’s most important mosque, the Great Mosque of Mecca, so I also interpreted the surrounding disparate coloured swirls and abstracted forms as symbolic of the cultural diversity of Muslims. I haven’t been able to discover any context for this drawing, except that Chilcott often drew on diversities in his work. So it is a mystery to me, why New Zealand born and raised Chilcott made this drawing, on that January day in 1986.

On the wall opposite was Talking Sticks by Carolyn Lye and above another text in Arabic. This read: “Until you have asked permission”

Left to Right: The Prison of Self, 2015, by Sonja van Kerkhoff, 20 cm diameter, photographic print, texts in Persian, Māori and English, and oil-based varnish. Edition of 35. Text is from the Hidden Words by Baha’ullah, founder of the Bahai Faith; Text in Arabic reads: “Until you have asked permission,”; Talking Sticks, Korare stems, acrylic paint – 5 pieces, by Carolyn Lye.

Middle Eastern Islamic societies put a high value on the protected space of the home. The Qur’an tells the believers “Do not enter houses — other than your own — until you have asked permission of the people of the house, and have greeted them with peace.” (14:27). It is the space itself and the family life it enables, that is inviolable, for if there is nobody home, the faithful are still told they should not enter (14:28). But hospitality in the home also has a high value. Respect for the protected space of family life constrains the behaviour of guests, who should not presume too much. Guests in the home of the Prophet were told “when you ask them for something, ask it of them from behind a hejaab screen (مِن وَرَاءِ حِجَابٍ).” (33:53)

Left to Right: The Prison of Self, by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Talking Sticks by Carolyn Lye; Conference of the Stones, 2013, video with soundscape by Phil Dadson (link to a discussion of this work); Detail of New Space / Takawaenga by Ursula Christel.


I associated the Arabic text to two loose ideas – the Middle Eastern Islamic practice of distinguishing or dividing between inner and outer domestic spaces and the use of the word ‘hejab’ which means screen and is the same word used for the headscarf. I placed two works nearby which I felt related aesthetically to this Middle Eastern Islamic sense of the protected space.

Talking Sticks by Carolyn Lye

Lye’s, Talking Sticks were arranged to create a ‘space’ behind them as well linking them to architecture of the gallery space. The second work, the circular “Prison of Self” by myself, shows text in Persian, English and Māori. It is a Bahai text, not Islamic, but Islamicate (from the space/s of an Islamic world). A translucent veil pierced by Persian text hangs like a screen in the photograph collage.

Left to Right: The Prison of Self by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Talking Sticks by Carolyn Lye; New Space / Takawaenga by Ursula Christel; Conference of the Stones by Phil Dadson.


Religions almost always involve the differentiation of space and meaning into the inner and outer, sacred and profane, referential and literal. The four works in this corner of the gallery, for me, are explorations of this theme of the differentiation of space and meaning in relation to Islam. In the video soundpiece, Conference of the Stones by Phil Dadson, profane stones are charged by action into a meditation or an invocation of the spirit.

The Māori title of Christel’s floorpiece, ‘Takawaenga’ (mediating/ed space/s), refers to a process. The work can also be read as an upside down table. A table that has been re-conceived in layerings, yet its circular form and central focus, created by the arrangement of the four legs, make it not a table but rather a direction for moving towards. In Sufi thought the lote tree of the outer limit (Sidrat al-Muntaha) marks the direction of all journeys. In choosing a circular table form and turning it over, the artist was inspired by George Dei’s words, “Inclusion is not bringing people into what already exists; it is making a new space, a better space for everyone.” 1

Left to Right: New Space / Takawaenga by Ursula Christel; Conference of the Stones by Phil Dadson; Peace Flight, 2011, giclée digital print by Brenda Liddiard. About her work >>

1. Dei, G.S.N. (2006). Meeting equity fair and square. Keynote address to the Leadership Conference of the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, September 28, 2006, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.

About the 24 artists in the exhibition >>

Carolyn Lye, based near Karetu, Northland, Aotearoa | New Zealand, is a fibre artist who weaves and works in natural materials.

Gavin Chilcott, born in Auckland, Aotearoa | New Zealand, in 1950 and attended Auckland Technical Institute in 1967 followed by three years at Elam, School of Fine Arts, Auckland, from 1968-1970. His first exhibition was at the Barry Lett Gallery in 1976 and since then he has exhibited widely throughout New Zealand and Internationally. He has been a recipient of numerous Arts grants and is represented in all major New Zealand Collections.

Sonja van Kerkhoff, born 1960 in Hawera, Taranaki, Aotearoa | New Zealand, has a diploma in Fine Arts (1980-82, Otago School of Arts), dip Secondary Teaching (1986), Masters equivalent with a double major (1989-93, School of Fine Arts, Maastricht, The Netherlands) and a MSc in Media Technology (2005-8, University of Leiden, The Netherlands). She lives in Kawakawa, Northland, Aotearoa / New Zealand and The Hague, The Netherlands. sonjavank.com

Ursula Christel, born 1961 in Durban, South Africa, is of Celtic/ Germanic descent, immigrated to New Zealand in 1996. She has a BA Degree, majoring in Fine Art and Art History (1979 – 81) and a post grad Diploma in Education (1982). She is an artist, tutor, writer and disability advocate, and worked as a writer, editor and photographer for the Celebrate Art series of educational resources, featuring New Zealand and Australian artists.

Auckland show – Islam in dialogue – NorthArt, closes 31 May 2020

22 May

Ko rātou, ko tātou | On Other-ness, on us-ness
NorthArt, Northcote, Auckland, Aotearoa | New Zealand

curated by Salama Moata McNamara + Sonja van Kerkhoff

Open now until 31 May 2020
Artists will be at the gallery 12-3pm,
Sat., Sun., and Monday, 12-3, 23-25th May

Ko rātou, ko tātou | On Other-ness, on us-ness NorthArt, Northcote, Auckland, Aotearoa | New Zealand curated by Salama Moata McNamara + Sonja van Kerkhoff opened 16 March 2020.

Left to Right: Wave, custom-made water tank by Jeff Thomson
Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level by Ursula Christel. Courtesy the artist and Mokopōpaki
Pilgrimage to Mecca by Gavin Chilcott.
From the Eros and Psyche series (111) by Joanna Margaret Paul
Two untitled corrugated iron sculptures by Jeff Thomson
(foreground) New Space / Takawaenga (2020) re-purposed wooden table (dia. 118cm), 4 table legs (H: 46cm), vinyl flooring, 3mm acrylic sheets (83 x 83cm), glass chess board (38 x 38cm), ceramic tile (20 x 20cm), composite board (dia. 65cm), jute, LED lights by Ursula Christel.
New Space / Takawaenga is a conceptual assemblage inspired by geometry and the floor plan of the Dome of the Rock. It refers also to a quote by George Dei (2006) – “Inclusion is not bringing people into what already exists; it is making a new space, a better space for everyone.”
Takawaenga is a process.
– Ursula Christel, 2020

Left to Right: Wave (detail), custom-made water tank by Jeff Thomson Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level (2018) by Ursula Christel. Courtesy the artist and Mokopōpaki Acrylic, gesso, printed perspex, metal lugs, pencil, sealant on board (99 x 61cm), plastic spirit level (6 x 61cm). Gavin Chilcott Pilgrimage to Mecca Framed pastel on paper. Arabic text above reads: "first house (avvala baytin)"

Left to Right: Wave (detail), custom-made water tank by Jeff Thomson
Vitruvian Angel Man with Spirit Level (2018) by Ursula Christel. Courtesy the artist and Mokopōpaki Acrylic, gesso, printed perspex, metal lugs, pencil, sealant on board (99 x 61cm), plastic spirit level
(6 x 61cm). Gavin Chilcott Pilgrimage to Mecca Framed pastel on paper.
Arabic text above reads: “first house (avvala baytin)” A4 text below this begins with:
“Indeed, the first House [of worship] established for humanity was that at Makkah
– blessed and a guidance for the worlds”. The Qur’an, 3:96

This is one of 5 texts in Arabic arranged around the first gallery.
More about these texts and the works in the next blog.

“Haykal Al Noor” (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza

still: “Haykal Al Noor” (Bodies of Light), site specific video installation by Narjis Mirza
with the soundscape, “Pamor” by Jessika Kenney
in this short video on youtube which also shows these works:
“Light District,” framed canvas, LED lighting, by John Mulholland;
“Halg” (Throat) video from the series Sokout/Silence, by Azadeh Emadi;
“Ka aroha” (Love), gouache and ink on paper,
by Salama McNamara & Emma Paton;
“Auckland Flowers 15/03/2019,” dried flowers, soil, compost, brown paper, by Java Bentley;
“Love is Blind,” embossed braille on paper,
by Tash Nikora;
“Fabric of Humanity” cast glass with impressions of a hijab pattern based on the hijab worn by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in 2019 by Layla Walter;
“Fifty-one” an installation incorporating an assemblage of painted stacked cards and texts from Rumi by Michelle Mayn.

artists
Adibah Saad, Wellington
Azadeh Emadi, Iran / Auckland / Glasgow, Scotland
Brenda Liddiard, Auckland,
Carolyn Lye, Karetu, The Far North,
Christina Wirihana, Bay of Plenty
Emma Paton, Auckland
Fiona Lee Graham, Auckland
Gavin Chilcott, Wellington
Java Bentley, Auckland
Jeff Thomson, Helensville
Jessika Kenney, Los Angeles, U.S.
Joanna Margaret Paul, Whanganui
John Mulholland, Warkworth
Layla Walter, Auckland
Lipika Sen, Auckland
Michelle Mayn, Auckland,
Narjis Mirza, Sydney, Australia
Phil Dadson, Auckland,
Tash Nikora, Whangārei
Salama Moata McNamara, Auckland
Sen McGlinn, Kawakawa
Sonja van Kerkhoff, Kawakawa | The Hague, The Netherlands
Tash Nikora, Whangārei
Ursula Christel (Mokopōpaki), Warkworth

Some photos of the exhibition are here: artsdiary.co.nz

Re:configuring @ The Shutter Room, Whangarei

14 Apr

Detail of Re:configuring by Sarah Kippenberger and Chris Schreuder

“Re:configuring” by Whangārei-based artists, Sarah Kippenberger and Chris Schreuder in the artist run The Shutter Room gallery and studio space, makes the aesthetic experience mutable and participatory.

Sarah Kippenberger and Chris Schreuder

Detail of over 80 images on one of the walls.



You are instructed to choose an image and then to find it peeping out of one of the orfices of the stacks of 80 or more banana boxes in the gallery space.

Detail in the Shutter Room gallery, Whangārei

The title of the show refers to the continually changing configurations created by the visitors. While the photographic images by the artists showing snippits of their lives are framed to be looked at, pondered over or recognized, the frames obscure more than they reveal and the installation of nooks and crannies and towers is not only random but temporary.

Detail in the Shutter Room gallery, Whangarei

Detail in the Shutter Room gallery, Whangārei

By removing both frame and label this project blurs authorship which often in the art world is an important part of the artwork’s value or reception. Visitors place and re-position the boxes and so affect the way the images or the boxes are read by the participants themselves as well as later visitor-participants. Not only the medium is blurred (installation, performance or an opportunity to rearrange) but also the usual separation between the art object and the gallery visitor. The risk is that the next visitor, expecting their art gallery experience to be about reading a static arrangement, sees nothing resembling ‘art.’ But like many social practice art projects which blur the borders between life and art, a clear context – here in the form of instructions to find the image – helps the viewer to step inside the magic circle and once engaged in the game there’s space for contemplation.

The banana box itself is a migrant entering the country on the back of trade as well as being the ubiquitous storage system. But I am being too serious, because this exhibition oozes with joy and lightheartedness. The images are light or delicate with not a trace of angst and none of the boxes are overly battered. There is an out of the box sense of exploration and play that blurs the lines of “object making, performance, political activism, community organizing, environmentalism and investigative journalism, creating a deeply participatory art” [1] experience. In another sense the box functions as an enabler of alterity (to reference Spivak whose 1997 Documenta lecture made a huge impact on me), a way of exhibiting the photographic in a divergent space – from the inside of the migrant banana box, with whatever baggage it might have that distinguishes it from a gallery wall.

Footnote: Outside the Citadel, Social Practice Art Is Intended to Nurture, New York Times, 2013

“Reconfiguring” by Sarah Kippenberger and Chris Schreuder,
29 March – 27 April 2019,
The Shutter Room, 9 Rust Avenue, Whangārei
Opposite the public library main door
Wed – Fri 12-4pm, Sat 10-2pm
The Shutter Room Facebook page

The Poetic Condition @ NorthArt – Gallery 2

15 Nov
"See Nothing," monoprint on paper by Roger Morris, "Bird of Prey" video by Sanne Maes

“See Nothing,” monoprint on paper by Roger Morris, “Bird of Prey” video by Sanne Maes, “Outer mantel 3” + “Outer mantel 4” (and each side of the open wall) by Yair Callender, “Trope” (in the third gallery beyond) by Raewyn Turner and ceramic sculpture by Jess Paraone, “Tomorrow will never be the same” interactive projection by Jian Yiwei and Sonja van Kerkhoff,
2 video loops by Pieterje van Splunter.

"Vaat" (Washing Up) 2014, stop motion animation, 7 minutes, 11 seconds, and "Cleaning the Air," 2014, video, 43 seconds

“Vaat” (Washing Up) 2014, stop motion animation, 7 minutes, 11 seconds, and “Cleaning the Air,” 2014, video, 43 seconds by Pieterje van Splunter, The Hague.
“Cleaning the Air” is a film of a sculpture by Pietertje which rotated diverse household items.

"Tomorrow will never be the same" interactive work by Jian Yiwei and Sonja van Kerkhoff, 2 video loops by Pieterje van Splunter.

“Tomorrow will never be the same” interactive work by Jian Yiwei and Sonja van Kerkhoff, 2 video loops by Pieterje van Splunter.

"Outer Mantel 4" by Yair Callender, “Tomorrow will never be the same” interactive work by Jian Yiwei and Sonja van Kerkhoff

“Outer Mantel 4” by Yair Callender, “Tomorrow will never be the same” interactive work by Jian Yiwei and Sonja van Kerkhoff

“Tomorrow will never be the same” interactive work by Jian Yiwei and Sonja van Kerkhoff[/caption] When you click on the Mondrian painting the pixel the mouse touches switches colours with another colour in the painting and then creates ‘children’ who land at random, where the same colour swap happens and more ‘children’ are created that swap colours. The affect is that the painting continuously mutates as if it is being eaten by colours. The order (straight lines) created by Mondrian is decomposed by randomness initiated by you.

"Tomorrow will never be the same" interactive work by Jian Yiwei and Sonja van Kerkhoff, 2 video loops by Pieterje van Splunter.

Detail of “Trope” (in the third gallery beyond) by Raewyn Turner and ceramic sculpture by Jess Paraone, “Outer Mantel 4” by Yair Callender, “Tomorrow will never be the same” interactive work by Jian Yiwei and Sonja van Kerkhoff

"Outer mantel 4" (and each side of the open wall) by Yair Callender

“Outer mantel 3 + 4” (on each side of the open wall), Layers of latex, LED lighting + recycled NZ pine, by Yair Callender. The wooden support was built to instructions given by Yair which included reusing old wood. Detail in the back gallery of drawings by Marianne Muggeridge.

Detail of "Outer mantel 4" by Yair Callender

Detail of “Outer mantel 3” by Yair Callender



 
Yair Callender, born in Groningen (1987) to a Dutch mother and a father who came from Suriname (South America) to the Netherlands to study in the early 1970s, is a graduate of the Hague Royal College of Arts (2014).

He works in concrete, plaster, clay and wood and his main focus is on making public sculpture.

Often his sculpture has some performative social element that involves the local community.

His major themes are cultural expressions and art in society in relation to playing with the idea of beauty in the ugly. The two larger pieces, layers of resin which are back-lit, were made for this exhibition.

These four pieces are playful interpretations of diverse religious symbols (Catholic gargoyles, Asian temples, the Kabbalah tree, etc) found on the exterior of buildings. He has made skins which are lit from within as a metaphor for our human condition – the beautiful seen through the rough and raw. Who could say art is ever ugly?
 

 

"Bird of Prey" video by Sanne Maes, latex light boxes by Yair Callender, Back gallery, "Your Honour" + "Eva was hier" (Eve was here) by Sonja van Kerkhoff, "" suspended panels by Alexis Hunter.

“Bird of Prey” video by Sanne Maes, latex light boxes by Yair Callender
Back gallery: “Your Honour” + “Eva was hier” (Eve was here) by Sonja van Kerkhoff, “Pandora’s Box” suspended panels by Alexis Hunter.

Detail: "Bird of Prey" video by Sanne Maes, latex light boxes by Yair Callender. Two videos by

Detail: “Bird of Prey” video by Sanne Maes, latex light boxes by Yair Callender. Two videos by Pieterje van Splunter

"Bird of Prey" video, HD, loop 0'25" photocopy on transparent paper. 21" LCD tv inside custom-made frame, 61 x 40, Edition of 3  "Outer mantel 3" latex, LED lighting + recycled NZ pine, by Yair Callender.

“Bird of Prey” video, HD, loop 0’25” photocopy on transparent paper. 21″ LCD tv inside custom-made frame, 61 x 40, Edition of 3. “Outer mantel 3” latex, LED lighting + recycled NZ pine, by Yair Callender.


 
“Bird of Prey” by Sanne Maes is from the morphological studies which concentrate on aspects of the outward appearance of humans and animals. In these works distant species are blended and so create transformations of identity.

 

 

 

Detail: "Bird of Prey" video by Sanne Maes. <br>The woman slowly turns her head away and then when she looks ahead her eyes match that of the hawk.

Detail: “Bird of Prey” video by Sanne Maes.

The woman slowly turns her head away and then when she looks ahead her eyes match that of the hawk.

Videos by Channa Boon (The Hague), by Jonathan Reus + Sissel Marie Tonn (The Hague), and by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris. Four etchings by Virgina Guy (Hikurangi, Northland). Side wall: Monoprint by Roger Morris (Taranaki), video by Sanne Maes (The Hague) and back lit latex relief by Yair Callender.

Videos by Channa Boon (The Hague), by Jonathan Reus + Sissel Marie Tonn (The Hague), and by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris (Auckland). Four etchings by Virgina Guy (Hikurangi, Northland).
Side wall: Monoprint by Roger Morris (Taranaki), video by Sanne Maes (The Hague) and back lit latex relief by Yair Callender.



 
The latex boxes by Yair Callender on the left light up when approached. Monoprint by Roger Morris. Suspended sheet metal and lamp by Sonja van Kerkhoff. Videos by Channa Boon, by Jonathan Reus + Sissel Marie Tonn, and by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris. Four etchings by Virgina Guy

The latex boxes by Yair Callender on the left light up when approached. Monoprint by Roger Morris. Suspended sheet metal and lamp by Sonja van Kerkhoff. Videos by Channa Boon, by Jonathan Reus + Sissel Marie Tonn, and by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris. Four etchings by Virgina Guy.

"Outer Mantel 1 + 2" responsive light latex light boxes by Yair Callender. "Road to JerUSAlem," monoprint on paper by Roger Morris.

“Plastic Play,” video by Pietertje van Splunter
Middle Gallery: “Outer Mantel 1 + 2” responsive light latex light boxes by Yair Callender. “Road to JerUSAlem,” monoprint on paper by Roger Morris.

Responsive light latex light boxes by Yair Callender. Monoprint on paper by Roger Morris. "Fain would they put out God's light," cut out text sheet steel, nylon and lamp by Sonja van Kerkhoff. "Et in Arcadia ego" 29 min video by Channa Boon, "Sensory Cartographies," 7 min video by Jonathan Reus + Sissel Marie Tonn. "Finding Flight," photo intaglio with gold leaf by Virginia Guy.

Responsive light latex light boxes by Yair Callender. Monoprint on paper by Roger Morris. “Fain would they put out God’s light,” cut out text sheet steel, nylon and lamp by Sonja van Kerkhoff. “Et in Arcadia ego” 29 min video by Channa Boon, “Sensory Cartographies,” 7 min video by Jonathan Reus + Sissel Marie Tonn. “Finding Flight,” photo intaglio with gold leaf by Virginia Guy.

Left: "Et in Arcadia ego," 2016, 29 minute video by Channa Boon.

Left: “Et in Arcadia ego,” 2016, 29 minute video by Channa Boon.

Joseph Stalin once expressed his view on art and cinema stating: “Propaganda is the strongest and most important weapon of our party and our battle, and in this battle the visual arts are the infantry while the cinema is the air force.” This was one of the inspirations for the video, “Et in Arcadia ego” by Channa Boon, shot in the former Soviet Union. While historical events are the carrier of the film, a chess game, played by two residents of Odessa, sitting near the city’s Arcadia Beach, is the physical link connecting the different locations: the Aral Sea (Uzbekhistan), Odessa (Ukraine) and Tbilisi (Georgia). This film ends when the chess game is over, but the large-scale power game that is still being played out in the former U.S.S.R. is not over. Stalin’s cotton industries for example, founded by him in Central Asia, are still the reason why large parts of the Aral Sea are gone and the entire region is polluted. In this work, Boon investigates the idea of ‘location’ as a ‘carrier of information’, which any individual or being can tap into, just by being present at a given spot. Conversely, the film aims to show the system of thoughts and ideas that, throughout history, has created both the physical landscape and those who live in it; how it has affected the way they think and act; and how a collective consciousness has been formed in the past and is still being formed in the present.
The phrase ‘Et in Arcadia Ego’ is from a text by Virgil, and is the title of a famous painting (1638) by Nicolas Poussin. The phrase refers to the ideal world that Communism aimed to bring about in this region and the nostalgia that it still invokes.

Above: "Finding Flight," photo intaglio with gold leaf. Edition 1/1, 23 x 28 cm adn "Finding Flight,"  photo Intaglio with gold leaf. Edition 1/1, 33 x 33 cm by Virginia Guy.

Above: two etchings by Virginia Guy. “Et in Arcadia ego” 29 min video by Channa Boon. “Sensory Cartographies,” 7 min video by Jonathan Reus + Sissel Marie Tonn. “Fallible,” 3 min video by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris.

“Sensory Cartographies” was filmed in the oldest primal forest in Europe in the upper altitudes of the island of Madeira to create a new entry into the herbarium of the Jardim Botanico in Funchal. The herbarium holds an archive of plant species and taxidermized animals dating back to the 16th century and serves as a blueprint of the history of colonization and acclimatization of plant species from the new world. Sissel Marie Tonn and Jonathan Reus created physiological data gathering devices and sensory-extension instruments to challenge the body’s conditioned ways of moving through the environment. These devices served to reshape a sensory worldview to create an alternative sensed cartography of this place. More: jonathanreus.com/portfolio

Above: "Finding Flight," photo intaglio with gold leaf. Edition 1/1, 23 x 28 cm <br>"Finding Flight,"  photo Intaglio with gold leaf. Edition 1/1, 33 x 33 cm by Virginia Guy. <br>"Sensory Cartographies," 7 min video by Jonathan Reus + Sissel Marie Tonn. <br>"Fallible," 3 min video by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris. Unscented flowers rotate above a vase which holds a sensor and the data from the sensor is turned into piano notes.

Above: “Finding Flight,” photo intaglio with gold leaf. Edition 1/1, 23 x 28 cm
“Finding Flight,” photo Intaglio with gold leaf. Edition 1/1, 33 x 33 cm by Virginia Guy.
“Sensory Cartographies,” 7 min video by Jonathan Reus + Sissel Marie Tonn.
“Fallible,” 3 min video by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris. Unscented flowers rotate above a vase which holds a sensor and the data from the sensor is turned into piano notes.
More: raewynturner.com/projects

Raewyn Turner & Brian Harris combine art, engineering, science research and their skills developed over years of practice in theatre, the film industry, robotics, interactive software, video, olfactory, art installations and performances. They engage simple elements with engineering to create experiential art, utilising everyday objects reinterpreted with robotics, electronics and microprocessors.

Wall on right: "See Nothing," monoprint on paper, 2017  by Roger Morris, video in custom frame by Sanne Maes.<br> 4 etchings on paper by Virginia Guy.

Wall on right: “See Nothing,” monoprint on paper, 2017 by Roger Morris,
“Bird of Prey” video in custom frame by Sanne Maes.
Back wall: 4 etchings on paper by Virginia Guy.

"Finding Flight," photo intaglio Edition 1/1, 75 suspended prints, 84 x 118 cm by Virginia Guy.

“Finding Flight,” photo intaglio Edition 1/1, 75 suspended prints, 84 x 118 cm by Virginia Guy.

"Finding Flight," photo intaglio on rag paper. Edition 1/10, 23 x 28 cm. "See Nothing," monoprint on paper. 2017, by Roger Morris [R E M O].

“Finding Flight,” photo intaglio on rag paper. Edition 1/10, 23 x 28 cm. “See Nothing,” monoprint on paper. 2017, by Roger Morris [R E M O].

"Outer Mantle 3," latex, LED lighting + recycled NZ pine, 2018, by Yair Callender. "Tomorrow will never be the same," interactive projection by Jian Yiwei + Sonja van Kerkhoff. Two video loops by Pietertje van Splunter. "A Meditation," 7 min video loop by Sonja van Kerkhoff. "Several Seas," laser print on transparency by Sonja van Kerkhoff. "The Experience of Change," interactive projection by Jian Yiwei + Sonja van Kerkhoff.

“Outer Mantle 3,” latex, LED lighting + recycled NZ pine, 2018, by Yair Callender. “Tomorrow will never be the same,” interactive projection by Jian Yiwei + Sonja van Kerkhoff. Two videos by Pietertje van Splunter. “A Meditation,” 7 min video loop by Sonja van Kerkhoff. “Several Seas,” laser print on transparency by Sonja van Kerkhoff. “The Experience of Change,” interactive projection by Jian Yiwei + Sonja van Kerkhoff.

“Once our World had Edges” 2017, 3 min, 22 sec., HD video using only NASA International Space Station footage.  Music: 'a distant backdrop' by sink \ sink, on the album 'a lone cloudburst' by Gareth Schott (Waikato).  "Several Seas," laser print, edition of 50, by Sonja van Kerkhoff.

Once our World had Edges” 2017, 3 min, 22 sec., HD video using only NASA International Space Station footage. Music: ‘a distant backdrop’ by sink \ sink, on the album ‘a lone cloudburst’ by Gareth Schott.
Several Seas,” laser print, edition of 50, by Sonja van Kerkhoff.

 
Gallery 1 | Gallery 3

Met dank aan Stroom Den Haag / with thanks to STROOM The Hague for finanicial assistance as well as to NorthArt.

The T-Shirt is the medium

11 Aug
Installation of T shirts as art

Front row: Ode to the cessation of bleeding by Lesley Anne Morgan (Te Awamutu), Alternative Activities for the Addicted by Elaine Arkell (London), Love Me Knots (with twists) by Sonja van Kerkhoff (The Hague), Elephants for Peace by Elaine Arkell, T-Shirt Plastic by Maureen Baker (Whangarei Heads), Out of Sequins by Brian Harris (Auckland), De-composition (with biogradable rubberbands) by Sonja van Kerkhoff.

Te T-Shirt Show
Curated by Sonja van Kerkhoff + Virginia Guy
Hikurangi Art Station, 31 King St, Hikurangi, Northland, Aotearoa | New Zealand

detail of Te T-Shirt show, Hikurangi, New Zealand

Detail of T-Shirt Plastic by Maureen Baker (made out of fused plastic bags), Out of Sequins by Brian Harris, De-composition (with biogradable rubberbands)
by Sonja van Kerkhoff.

20 Artists:
Elaine Arkell (London, U.K.) | Maureen Baker (Whangarei Heads) | Hamish Oakley-Browne (Whangarei) | Susan Burgess (Christchurch) | Megan Corbett (Hikurangi) | Virginia Guy (Hikurangi) | Brian Harris (Auckland) | Dulcie Hering (Hikurangi) | Sen McGlinn (Kawakawa) | Lesley Anne Morgan (Te Awamutu) | Julia Newland (Whangarei Heads) | Benjamin Pittman (Hikurangi) | Lisa Ponweiser + Mt Hutt College students (Methven) | Jason Ratahi (Opunake) | Jacob Squire (Hikurangi) | Ursula Safar (Wales) | Te Kowhai Trust (Whangarei) | John Thomson (Hampshire, U.K.) | Raewyn Turner (Auckland) | Sonja van Kerkhoff (The Hague, The Netherlands) | Jacqueline Wassen (Maastricht, The Netherlands). Te shirts as the medium for an art show

detail of a T shirt by Lesley Anne Morgan

T-shirts by Lesley Anne Morgan + Elaine Arkell.
Click for a larger view.

Front row:
Ode to the cessation of bleeding by Lesley Anne Morgan. In celebration of menopause, the delicately cut out pieces were scattered on the floor underneath this. The black t-shirt behind this is ‘Arch Overload’ – Portsmouth Festival – 1990, custom made by John Thomson. (thomsonart.co.uk) and Alternative Activities for the Addicted by Elaine Arkell is next, who wrote: “Well, yes I once was a foolish smoker with teeth all stained and brown. The wrangle with nicotine was long and hard and this work came through and out of that wrangle.”

Love Me Knots (with twists) by Sonja van Kerkhoff

Love Me Knots (with twists)

The design for her shirt which features an original 1960s spirogragh drawing made as an ‘alternative activity’ for smoking and the T-shirt was created for the “Your Art Here (too)” on Camberwell Green, South London for Daniel Lehan’s Camberwell arts Week event in 2010. This T-shirt series also had an outing to Brighton with David Medella and the artists of the London Biennale for the project, Longshore Drift. The pink T-shirt, Love Me Knots (with twists) by Sonja van Kerkhoff is a play on materiality and sentiment with the row of rosebud knots at gut level.

Left to Right, 4th row from the front:

The Te T Shirt show

Click for a larger view.

Tīmatanga Kaitiaki (Protected or guided beginning, start or intro) by Jason Ratahi. A T-shirt of slogans in Māori and New Zealand English, Red by Sonja van Kerkhoff, a padded and filled T Shirt. Rabbits by Dulcie Hering. The light blue Tao Shirt by Susan Burgess has the symbol cut. The black shirt at the end of the next row is ‘seed, crop, harvest’ from the album CLAY CLASS DFA Records New York, 2012 by John Thomson, who wrote “My kinetic sculptures feature in the music videos of the U.K. band, Prinzhorn Dance School.” Next is ‘I begin I end’ What I do in between is up to me, a unique symbol screenprint by Megan Corbett while Rabbit by Dulcie Hering is a printed design sewn onto a T-Shirt.

t-shirts

Details of T-shirts by Susan Burgess + Raewyn Turner.
Click for a larger view.

Apron with anti-spasmodic, anti-arthritic, anti-rheumatic galbanum by Raewyn Turner is a blue T-shirt that was cut and resewn into the form of an apron with cloth sachet of perfume. In constrast to Raewyn’s repurposing of the T-shirt, Forget Us Not is purpose-made by Ursula + Alison for their rural gardening business which cares for the gardens of the oft ‘forgotten’ in our society: the elderly.