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Engaged personal connections

12 Dec

by Brit Bunkely, Adrienne Spratt, Michelle Backhouse, Pietertje van Splunter, Edward Walton

Left to Right: St Cyricus, plastic, artificial flowers and Epoxy, 40 x 15 x 60 cm by Brit Bunkley; Netting, wire and acrylic, by Michelle Backhouse; Pouhine (red basket form), harakeke (flax), muka (flax fibre), commercial dyes. Raranga + whatu (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt; Lake Alice Water-tower, plastic, paint and artificial flowers, 60 x 12 x 12 cm, by Brit Bunkley; Into the pink, wire and acrylic, by Michelle Backhouse; Cleaning the Air, 43 sec video + Daily Dishes, 7 min 11 sec video by Pietertje van Splunter; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; From the War / No War series, six laser print on card reliefs (obliquely on the wall) by Hohepa; Kete Pingao, 20 x 10 cm, woven basket by Brenda Tuuta; Herenga rahi (Big connections/confinement), harakeke, muka, tanekaha bark and paru dyes. Raranga, whatu (Māori weaving techniques, suspended basket) by Adrienne Spratt.

The Poetic Condition was a show of multifaceted visions in diverse media on engaged personal connections with history, culture and social worlds by 13 artists based in the Hague and New Zealand.

by Brit Bunkley + Michelle Backhouse

Left to Right: St Cyricus by Brit Bunkley, Netting by Michelle Backhouse.

Brit Bunkley’s St Cyricus looks like a doll from a by gone age but is a 3D scan of a 1470-80 marble statue of the child saint by Italian Renaissance sculptor, Francesco Laurana.
Bunkley saw this statue in the Los Angeles Getty museum (view this statue) and was intrigued by the idea of a saint being a child. The story goes that in about 200-300 AD, that the child while being held by the governor (while the child’s mother, Saint Julitta, was on trial) the child stated that he was also a Christian and bit the governor. For this act of defiance the child was killed. Other stories tell of him being brutally tortured. The Renaissance artist incorporated symbols of sainthood such as the palm and laurel branches, and the cut off body suggests that he might be in a cauldron. The recasting of this in dark grey plastic with the addition of artificial flowers, makes the work an enigma because both aspects of social history (the religious and the art context of the statue at present) are simultaneously referenced and distanced.

by Edward Walton + Anne Wellmer

L to R: Een Rode Citroen (A red lemon), 2015, 9 min 53 sec., video + soundscape by Anne Wellmer; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; Lake Alice Water-tower + St Cyricus by Brit Bunkley.

Lake Alice Water-tower, from the abject history series, is another sculpture by Brit Bunkley created with 3D printer from scans of an existing structure also with a flower insert. Perhaps this work is nature vs culture, or nature out of culture. Water towers are still iconic structures in small New Zealand towns. This tower, in particular, makes reference to another aspect of New Zealand’s abject history, the infamous rural pyschiatric institution, Lake Alice. Like many New Zealand psychiatric hospitals, Lake Alice was self-sufficient, with its own farm, workshop, bakery, laundry, and fire station as well as its now questionable practices on its inmates. It closed in 1999.

The flower could be a sign that nature always endures, always has some measure of self-sufficency, while the static cultural innate object gains or loses meaning if its function is lost. However in foregrounding the materiality of these sculptures, such as details in the greyer than grey facades, he reminds us that this is still artifice, it is still plastic, and in the end this is a sculpture of oppositions that forces us to take our own stance.

by Michelle Backhouse, Edward Walton

Left to Right: Kāinga a roto (Home Within), suite of 5 videos (on laptop) by Sonja van Kerkhoff, Adumbrate No. 2, 2014, wire netting + Untitled, 2017, wire netting and building paper by Michelle Backhouse; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; Een Rode Citroen (A red lemon), 2015, animation, 9′ 53” by Anne Wellmer. Soundtrack: Anne Wellmer. Drawings: Geerten Ten Bosch. Animation: Harriët van Reek. Text excerpt from The Writing Notebooks (edited in English by Susan Sellers) by Hélène Cixous. Voice: Stephie Büttrich-Kolman.

The gallery space was dominated by Anne Wellmer’s soundscapes from her 3 videos played in a loop. Medieval chanting, whisperings in German and English, sounds, narration, instructional or provocative texts connected us with individualistic collaborative worlds. The 9 minute animation Een Rode Citroen (A red lemon), was a surreal exploration of a mutating organic inner and outer ‘strange-scape’ in which eerie sounds and the evocative text (in English) by Jewish-French, Algerian-born poststructuralist feminist, Hélène Cixous complemented biological galatical worlds.
Still from Vox Sanguinis (Voice of the blood), video and soundtrack: Anne Wellmer.

Still from Vox Sanguinis (Voice of the blood), 1’53”. Video and soundtrack: Anne Wellmer. Video and soundtrack: Anne Wellmer. Camera: Florian Cramer. Voice: Cora Schmeiser. Music: “O rubor sanguinis” by Hildegard of Bingen. Trumpet: Heimo Wallner. Silent performer and stage design: Geerten Ten Bosch


Another video Vox Sanguinis (Voice of the blood), was a teaser for the music theater performance by Cora Schmeiser with new compositions inspired by Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) by 4 Dutch composers: Giuliano Bracci, Kate Moore, Lukas Simonis, Boudewijn Tarenskeen and Aliona Yurtsevich. The sound design and live electronics were by Anne Wellmer. Vox Sanguinis toured to four cities in the Netherlands in 2015.

by Martje Zandboer, The Happiest place on earth, plastic, paint and artifical flowers by Brit Bunkley

Left to Right: Warm Memories, emulsion on five suspended teabags by Martje Zandboer; The Happiest place on earth, plastic, paint and artifical flowers, 55 x 45 x 10 cm, by Brit Bunkley; Kāinga a roto (Home Within), videos (on laptop) by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Adumbrate No. 2, 2014, wire netting + Untitled, 2017, wire netting and building paper by Michelle Backhouse; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; Transfusionen (Transfusions), 2015, video with sound, 2′ 43” by Anne Wellmer. Sound: Anne Wellmer. Hands: Geerten Ten Bosch. Voice: Cora Schmeiser. Music fragment from BLAST (2015) by Lukas Simonis. Text fragment from ‘Della Religione Christiana’ by Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499), first published in Italian in 1568. This German translation was published in ‘Das Blut: Symbolik und Magie’ (Blood: Symbolism and Magic) (2004) by Piero Camporesi; St Cyricus 3D plastic print sculpture by Brit Bunkley.

The whisperings in German in the video Transfusionen (Transfusions) spoke of medieval beliefs about witches using the blood of children to make medicine and the various uses (transfusions or transmutations) of this medicine, including the making of wine.

The sounds from these three videos were the soundscape of this show unless one put on headphones to listen to two of the other videos in the exhibition. Under two spatial abstractions of wire by Michelle Backhouse was the suite of videos, Kāinga a roto (Home Within), by Sonja van Kerkhoff (More >>) and around the corner was the 29 minute video, Et in Arcadia Ego by Channa Boon.

Sonja van Kerkhoff

Left to Right: Et in Arcadia Ego, 29 min video by Channa Boon; Love of the other, 10 cm diameter, print on aluminium by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Muka and taniko kete, harakeke muka, tanekaha bark + paru dyes. Whatu and taniko (Māori fibre and weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt; What kind of Idea, print on dubond by Sonja van Kerkhoff (More >>).

Et in Arcadia Ego was filmed in the former Soviet Union during an artists’ roadtrip. While historical events are the carrier of the film, a chess game, played by two residents of Odessa, sitting near the city’s Arcadia Beach, is the physical link connecting the different locations: the Aral Sea (Uzbekhistan), Odessa (Ukraine) and Tbilisi (Georgia). This film ends when the chess game is over, but the large-scale power game that is still being played out in the former U.S.S.R. is not over. Stalin’s cotton industries for example, founded by him in Central Asia, are still the reason why large parts of the Aral Sea are gone and the entire region is polluted. It has turned out to be the largest environmental disaster of the 20th century. In this work, Boon investigates the idea of location as a carrier of information, which any individual or being can tap into, just by being present at a given spot. Conversely, the film aims to show the system of thoughts and ideas that, throughout history, has created both the physical landscape and those who live in it; how it has affected the way they think and act; and how a collective consciousness has been formed in the past and is still being formed in the present.

Virgil’s phrase ‘Et in Arcadia Ego’ is also the title of a famous painting (1638) by Nicolas Poussin. The painting shows a group of shepherds who discover the phrase on a tomb, and so become aware of the existence of death in their Arcadian existence. This gives them the capacity to reflect and thus develop self-awareness. In this video, Boon connects this loss of innocence of the Arcadian shepherd – signifying an ideal world that is destroyed forever – with the present and past of the former Soviet Union. Hence, the phrase becomes a reference to the ideal world that Communism aimed to bring about in this region and the nostalgia that it still invokes.

paperpulp by Michelle  Backhouse, The Image (The spectacle is mesmeric in  order to be successful), silkscreen print and mixed  media + Where change is barely visible, 2008, laser print by Sonja van Kerkhoff

Left to Right: The Happiest place on earth, plastic, paint and artifical flowers by Brit Bunkley; Enclosure No. 1 wire netting + paperpulp by Michelle Backhouse; The Image (The spectacle is mesmeric in order to be successful), silkscreen print and mixed media (More >>) + Where change is barely visible, 2008, laser print by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Kete Whakairo (on table), dyed flax basket by Brenda Tuuta; Et in Arcadia Ego, 29 min video by Channa Boon.

The works surrounding this video were a pull and push on this theme of the romantic: Michelle Backhouse’s wire grid in colours that referenced nature and yet were unnatural in a formation that was both plant-like and yet inorganically abstract, woven baskets by Brenda Tuuta and Adrienne Spratt juxtaposed with works bearing politicized texts, and Brit Bunkley’s plastic model of the Disneyland castle recast as a ruin.

Left to Right: Mauri, harakeke, raranga (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt; Josephine’s Mother, print on aluminium, acrylic and varnish by Sonja van Kerkhoff (More >>); Bird of Prey, mixed media video loop by Sanne Maes; Untitled + Dark Entries, black and white photographs + The Speed of Dark, models on a shelf by Thom Vink; Warm Memories, photographic emulsion on teabags + magnets by Martje Zandboer and The Happiest place on earth, plastic, paint and artifical flowers, 55 x 45 x 10 cm, by Brit Bunkley (More >>).

by Adrienne Spratt

Left to Right: detail of Girl with Iberian Lynx by Michelle Backhouse; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; From the War / No War series, six laser print on card reliefs, each is 10 x 15 x 2 cm, by Hohepa; Poutama (Step pattern), cylinder shaped basket + Herenga rahi (Big connections/confinement), harakeke, muka, tanekaha bark and paru dyes. Raranga, whatu (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt.

Martje Zandboer’s suspended photographic emulsion teabags, Thom Vink’s models and photographs and Sanne Maes’ mixed media video loop develop this pull and push into dialogue between the familiar and the other, estranged or mysterious. Adrienne Spratt’s basket below, reads as an empty vessel while its title alludes to a spirit filled essence.

On the other side of the gallery space are two more woven vessels by Adrienne Spratt. The enormous basket sways from numerous lines. Its title refers to both connection and enclosure.

Adrienne Spratt

Pouhine, Harakeke, muka, commercial dyes.  Raranga and whatu techniques by Adrienne Spratt.

Edward Walton’s gestural abstract paintings are like signatures or ‘nature traces’ while Michelle Backhouse’s paper pulp, building paper and mixed media, Girl with Iberian Lynx, from the species facing extinction series, references the tangible topic of environmental responsibility.

On the adjacent wall a frieze relief of reproductions of paintings from Hohepa’s War / No War series uses Maori cultural symbols as commentary issues of the day. Below this is a small purse-like open pingao (a New Zealand natuve yellow grass) basket by Brenda Tuuta.

In another corner lines flow out from the red basket, Pouhine by Adrienne Spratt, which blur its contours. The title refers to the pattern woven into the sides.

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Left ot Right: Detail of Into the Pink, wire and paper pulp + Girl with Iberian Lynx by Michelle Backhouse; From the War / No War series, six laser print on card reliefs, each is 10 x 15 cm, by Hohepa; Kete Pingao, 20 x 10 cm, woven basket by Brenda Tuuta; Poutama (Step pattern), cylinder shaped basket + Herenga rahi (Big connections/confinement), harakeke, muka, tanekaha bark and paru dyes. Raranga, whatu (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt, Paewae (Threshold), aluminium print (above doorway) by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Lake Alice Water-tower, plastic sculpture by Brit Bunkley; Josephine’s Mother, print on aluminium, acrylic and varnish by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Mauri (essence/spirit), harakeke, raranga (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt; Detail of Bird of Prey, mixed media video loop by Sanne Maes.

Hohepa

Left to Right: From the War / No War series: Warrior with Taiaha, Patu-paiarehe lovers, black and white laser prints on card, Warrior with Taiaha, Mākutu, No more war with Taiaha laid down, Rangatahi, colour laser prints on card, each piece approx. 10 x 15 x 2 cm, by Hohepa; Kete Pingao, 20 x 10 cm, woven basket by Brenda Tuuta.

The heart of Hohepa’s work is a dialectical process – fed from his Māori heritage. He descends from the tribes: Ngāti Whakaue, Tuhourangi, Tuwharetoa ki te Aupouri, Tapu Ika, Rangitihi, Uenukukopako, Te Arawa, Ngāpuhi (Whangaroa), Ngāti Kai Tangata. These small reliefs are prints of 1 x 2 metre paintings from the War / No War series exhibited in 2017 in the Chiesa San Antonio, Lecce, a Baroque church in southern Italy.
van Splunter

Left to Right: Into the pink, wire and acrylic, by Michelle Backhouse; Detail: Lake Alice Water-tower, plastic, paint and artificial flowers by Brit Bunkley; Cleaning the Air, 43 sec video + Daily Dishes, 7 min 11 sec video by Pietertje van Splunter.

The video Cleaning the Air is actually a recording of a mobile sculpture which animates various household cleaning objects while in the video, Daily Dishes, the mundane chore of doing the dishes is turned into an animation of colour and pattern.
Still from Cleaning the Air by Pietertje van Splunter

Still from Cleaning the Air by Pietertje van Splunter.

Pietertje van Splunter’s videos are like a poetics on the mundane: housework. Her brooms seem animated by an unearthly force and the constant stacking of the differing tribes of kitchen utensils suggests a game with secret rules. In using humour with the overkill her videos are reminders that the everyday domestic, is also a microcosm of the amusing, perhaps necessary banality of habit while Michelle Backhouse’s sculptures use seemingly banal materials, building paper, netting or house paint to create ethereal protusions.

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Inter-sensory correspondences

13 Jan
Detail of the Poetic Condition exhibition, Shutter Room, Whangarei

Detail of “The Poetic Condition” in the Shutter Room, Whangarei.
Left to Right: Triptych by Inge Reisberman, Photos and model by Thom Vink, Video-drawing by Sannes Maes and the grid of photo-drawing combinations by Christiaan van Tol.

Tomorrow is the final day of the show and this ends with a spectacular presentation beginning at 12 noon by Auckland artist, Raewyn Turner, who will show and demonstrate inter-sensory correspondences in her own art projects as well as leading a discussion on ‘the poetic condition’ when it comes to the artistic practice. Links to a 7 min film about her scent work and where and when, and the Facebook event page.

Left to Right: Photograph + mixed media by Marg Morrow, Photogram by Megan Dickinson, Videos by Pietertje van Splunter, detail of a photo-model installation by Thom Vink

Left to Right: Photograph + mixed media by Marg Morrow, Photogram by Megan Dickinson, Videos by Pietertje van Splunter, detail of a photo-model installation by Thom Vink

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Left to Right: Detail of photos and model by Thom Vink, Two photo-grams by Lisa Clunie, Photograph by Elektra Bakhshov.

Left to Right:

Left to Right: Photograph by Ellie Smith, Print by Sonja van Kerkhoff, Video by Anne Wellme (in collaboration with Geerten Ten Bosch, Harriët van Reek + Stephie Büttrich-Kolman), Photograph + mixed media by Marg Morrow, Photogram by Megan Dickinson, Videos by Pietertje van Splunter, detail of a photo-model installation by Thom Vink, Video by Channa Boon.

Disarm at TodaysArt, The Hague

26 Sep

23-25 September 2016

Disarm (mechanized) by Pedro Reyes in Pulchiri, The Hague.

Disarm (mechanized) by Pedro Reyes in Pulchiri, The Hague.

“Disarm (mechanized)” by Pedro Reys are a collection of mechanical musical instruments made in part out of firearms, including revolvers, shot-guns and machine-guns, given to him by the Mexican government in the city of Ciudad, Juarez, after they had been rendered useless by tanks and steamrollers. In hearing of his work “Palas Por Pistolas,” where he transformed 1,527 guns owned by the residents of Culiacán by melting these down into 1,527 shovels, which were then used to plant 1,527 trees around the world, he was offered 6,700 destroyed weapons from the Mexican Secretary of Defence in 2012. “Disarm (Mechanized),” his second work made from these firearms, can either be automated or played live by an operator using a laptop computer or midi keyboard. This 3.55 min video clip is a piece run from a laptop titled “Turner 2015” in the Pulchri gallery in the Hague.

“For Pedro Reyes the process of transforming weapons into objects of positive utility was more than physical. “It’s important to consider that many lives were taken with these weapons; as if a sort of exorcism was taking place, the music expelled the demons they held, as well as being a requiem for the lives lost.” Artlyst.com, 25 Sept, 2015

“Pedro Reyes’ work is a socio-political critique on contemporary society and our responsibility towards it. His projects are catalysts for communal and psychological transformation, triggering group interaction and creativity.

Disarm is a demand for towns and cities across the world to relinquish their weapons and transform them from agents of death to agents of life. It is an attempt to highlight the invisible violence that underpins the international industry of death and suffering: the commercial and government complicity that allows for weapons to be made and sold by public companies for shareholder profit; the laws banning assault rifles which go neglected; and the films and video-games which depict trigger-happy heroes. For Reyes, an idealist whose projects affect real change and are often explicit attempts to improve the society around him, a world free of guns is a human right, and a utopian ideal to which we should all aspire.” Lisson Gallery, 2013, London.

Pedro Reyes was born in Mexico City in 1972, where he lives and works. He has won international attention for his large-scale projects that associate social issues with imaginative solutions. Pedro Reyes was awarded a Medal for the Arts in January 2015, by the US State Department for his continued commitment to the State Department’s cultural diplomacy outreach.

See his website or his blog for more.

TodaysArt Festival, hosted annually since 2005 in the Hague, focusses on the presentation and development of contemporary visual and performing arts and emerging culture. About the 2016 edition.

WaterWheel Last Chance

16 Mar

19-21 March 2016

Waitapu (sacred water) Wairere (flowing water) by Vallance Wrathall, New Zealand

Waitapu (sacred water) Wairere (flowing water) by Vallance Wrathall, New Zealand, for the first session for the 2016 Water Works online symposium curated by Ian Clothier which will air, New Zealand time, on March 19th at 4pm. Tune in here: water-wheel.net/taps-list

“The placement of this installation at Ngamotu beach, New Plymouth, was in relation to the historical significance this water source had with the people of this area, extending as far back as the 1600s through to today. Water has a story to tell, we as people need to take our time to listen.”
Vallance Wrathall, 2016.

Climate change, financial crises, war, and global environmental damage have all put pressures on water forcing it to ‘work’ as commodity, capital and resource. While the natural world ‘works’ in the maintenance and transformation of water, there are also the ‘works’ created by the passing actions of floods, tides and storms. How can art, science, design, and activism reinstate the social, cultural and environmental value of water? How can we give recognition to the indispensable and invaluable ways that water works?

This will be your last chance to tune into to watch the annual water themed presentations and performances using the Waterwheel interactive, collaborative platform from March 19 onwards http://water-wheel.net/taps-list (This link shows you the time and date in your local time for the 7 sessions spread over 34 hours. You only need to log in if you wish to comment.) Run marathon-style, each 2 hour session will be broadcast from a different part of the world.

Screen capture during ‘100 Names for Water’ talk by Ulay during the opening of the “Water Views: Caring and Daring - Waterwheel World Water Day Symposium 2014.

Screen capture during ‘100 Names for Water’ talk by Ulay during the opening of the “Water Views: Caring and Daring – Waterwheel World Water Day Symposium 2014.” The images of Ulay (in Slovenia) and Suzon Fuks (in Brisbane) show the live video feed in a ‘stage’ panel where you can add up to 6 ‘video windows’ as well as text, slideshows or drawings. The live text chat is on the right. You can watch this talk here: water-wheel.net/media_items/view/4851

This annual online global event, run since 2012, is a showcase on water by artists, scientists, activists and academics from all walks of life.

Some of these presentations are later published, and in 2014 an e-book was published which you can view here >> blog.water-wheel.net/2015/02/e-book-water-views-3WDS14.html
Here 450 participants, from 34 countries across 5 continents, interacted with audiences in real time on the internet and in 18 physical venues or ‘nodes,’ using the Waterwheel online video and sound platform. The symposium, held 17-23 March 2014, also focussed on a youth & inter-generational dialogue “Voice of the Future” strand.

Waterwheel was co-founded in August 2011 by Brisbane-based artist, Suzon Fuks, the design studio Inkahoots, who developed this, and the arts organisation Igneous, which manages it. It has never had any paid staff and the resources for its development from Australian national and Queensland state government arts funding were for artists who did projects using the platform. So now after 5 years the 2016 annual water themed online conference will be the last.

So to wet your appetite for this year’s theme Water Works – where 22 curators from 19 countries will discuss selected entries and respond to an online audience in a streaming event on Waterwheel.

The programme overview is here: http://bit.ly/WATERworks-programme

Indian classical singer Mahesha Vinayakram will open and close “Water Works” with a performance.

The first two hour session (water-wheel.net/taps/view/854) will be presentations of videos selected by San Franscico-based artist and teacher, Michele Guieu (micheleguieu.com/wordpress) followed by a presentation of seven New Zealand artists, curated by Ian Clothier (ianclothier.com) who runs the biannual media art residency and symposium SCANZ(www.intercreate.org) in New Plymouth where he lives.

The next session (water-wheel.net/taps/view/855), starting 2 hours later, is curated by Katarina Djordjevic Urosevic ((artskylight.com), Serbia), Joanna Hoffmann (University of Arts, Studio for Transdisciplinary Projects and Research, Poznan, Poland) and artist Pascale Barret (pascalebarret.com), Belgium)

Water Works session #3 (water-wheel.net/taps/view/856) is curated by:
West D.L. Marrin, an applied scientist in biogeochemistry, pollutant dynamics, water resources, and aquatic ecology. His lectures focus on global water quality threats, hydromimicry practices, and the water-energy-food nexus. He is a former adjunct professor at San Diego State University, U.S.A.;
Claudia Jacques & Victoria Vesna (waterbodies.org). Claudia (claudiajacques.com), currently a PhD candidate at the Planetary Collegium, CAiiA Hub, University of Plymouth, UK., researches space-time aesthetics in the user-information-interface relationship through the lens of Cybersemiotics. Intersecting art, technology and science, she designs interactive hybrid art and information environments that aim to explore perceptions of space-time and the digital-physical in the pursuit of human consciousness. Victoria (victoriavesna.com) is an artist and Professor at the UCLA Department of Design | Media Arts and Director of the Art|Sci center at the School of the Arts and California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI))
and Lila Moore (mdx.academia.edu/LilaMoore), an artist film-maker, screen choreographer, networked performance practitioner, and theorist based in Israel. She is a post-doctoral researcher at The I-Node of the Planetary Collegium, Plymouth University, UK, and holds a doctorate from Middlesex University in Dance on Screen which explores choreography for the camera and screen-dance in the contexts of performative and hybrid art forms, with special reference to ritual and myth from a feminine/feminist perspective.

Water Works session #4 (water-wheel.net/taps/view/857) is on sound art works and is curated by Leah Barclay, Eric Leonardson and Ricardo Dal Farra.
Leah Barclay (leahbarclay.com) is an Australian interdisciplinary artist, composer and researcher who specialises in electroacoustic music, sound art and acoustic ecology. Leah has received critical acclaim for her immersive performances, installations and large-scale community projects that explore volatile environments ranging from the central Amazon Rainforest to the floor of the Australian ocean. Her work is multi-platform in nature and often involves long-term community engagement accompanied by the development of virtual platforms to explore the value of digital technology in environmental crisis. Her diverse creative practice has resulted in a dynamic freelance career where she works as an artist, consultant, educator and researcher with various organisations and institutions. These include designing immersive education programs for UNESCO, directing large-scale interdisciplinary research projects for major universities across Australia and the USA and facilitating partnerships between communities, NGOs and government to explore creative approaches to climate action.
Eric Leonardson (ericleonardson.org) is a Chicago-based composer, radio artist, sound designer, instrument inventor, improviser, visual artist, and teacher. He has devoted a majority of his professional career to unorthodox approaches to sound and its instrumentation with a broad understanding of texture, atmosphere and micro-tones.
And Ricardo Dal Farra (linkedin.com/in/ricardodalfarra) is an Argentine composer and multimedia artist, researcher, educator, performer and curator focusing mainly on new media arts and electroacoustic music for more than 25 years. Dal Farra holds a PhD in Etude et pratiques des arts from Université du Québec à Montréal and is Founding Director of Centro de Experimentación e Investigación en Artes Electrónicas – CEIArtE (Electronic Arts Experimenting and Research Centre) at National University of Tres de Febrero, Argentina; Associated Researcher at the Music, Technology and Innovation Research Centre, De Montfort Univerisity, United Kingdom; and Senior Consultant for the Amauta – Andean Media Arts Centre in Cusco, Peru.

Water Works session #5 (water-wheel.net/taps/view/858) is curated by:
Eklavya Prasad (linkedin.com) a social development professional who has led a grassroots campaign in rural north Bihar, New Dehli, India, since 2005 on decentralized and alternative drinking water solutions;
Atefeh Khas (atefehkhas.com) an Iranian artist who specializes in environmental installations, and is a member of the environmental artists group “Open Five” since 2005,
and Catherine Lee + Margaret Shiu, directors of the Bamboo Curtain artist residency studio (bambooculture.com), in Taipei, Taiwan.

Water Works session #6 (water-wheel.net/taps/view/859) is curated by:
Tracey Benson (canberra.academia.edu/TraceyBenson) a media artist and academic based in Canberra, Australia;
Amin Hammami (linkedin.com) previously a lecturer in Cinema, Audiovisual and Sound Art at the Higher Institute of Multimedia Arts of Manouba in Tunisia and now at the University of Dammam in Saudi Arabia. He has been involved with Waterwheel since 2011.
Tracey Benson (canberra.academia.edu/TraceyBenson), and
Amin Hammami (linkedin.com) previously a lecturer in Cinema, Audiovisual and Sound Art at the Higher Institute of Multimedia Arts of Manouba in Tunisia and now at the University of Dammam in Saudi Arabia. He has been involved with Waterwheel since 2011, and
Camilla Boemio (camillaboemio.com), an Italian curator focussing on socio-political developments within contemporary society. She was Deputy Curator of the Maldives Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale and was consultant for the art-science section at ISWA European project (Immersion in the Science Worlds through Arts).

A workshop on audio recording and streaming
(water-wheel.net/taps/view/860) by the London arts collective, Soundcamp (soundtent.org). Technologies for setting up a temporary or long-term live audio stream using a mobile phone or a laptop as well as a dedicated streambox out of low cost components, using the Raspberry Pi micro processor and Primo microphone capsules to make up cheap, high quality stereo microphones, will be demonstrated.
Real time audio has the potential to create a compelling connection to a site, which can directly convey much of the feel and uniqueness of a location. A small but significant group of projects is establishing a network of streams from diverse soundscapes around the world. Some of these events are SoundCamp 2016, (30 April – 1 May 2016), a 24 hour live stream of audio radio around the globe for International Dawn chorus Day (idcd.info) on May 1st, the Locus Sonus open microphone network (locusonus.org), the Balance Unbalance conference on acoustics and ecology in Colombia (9-11 May 2016), and World Listening Day 2016 (18 July 2016).

Water Works session #7 (water-wheel.net/taps/view/861) is curated by:
Annie Abrahams (bram.org) based in France, she is an pioneer of networked performance art.
Russell Milledge (researchgate.net) a co-founder of the interdisciplinary artists’ collective Bonemap (bonemap.com) which is concerned with the ecological edges of civilisation while creating immersive art and performance based in far northern Australia. Projects often engage Cape York, Torres Strait Islander and international contemporary artists.
Jason Grant (Australia)

And the waterwheel blog is an archive of water related events: http://blog.water-wheel.net