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Bodies of Light – including Islam in a New Zealand aesthetic landscape

8 Jun

These five blogs are an attempt to do some justice to, Ko rātou, ko tātou | On Other-ness, on us-ness, an exhibition that few individuals were able to see due to the gallery being closed because of COVID-19, on March 15, and from March 23 until mid May. The impetus for this exhibition, was my own experiences a year previously, following the Christchurch Mosque massacres. I realised how little experience many empathetic New Zealanders had of Islam. I am a Bahai, not a Muslim, but I have some insight into the diverse cultures of Islam because, over the decades, I, like many Bahais have engaged with Muslims and the Islamic worlds.

Detail of  Huroof e Muqataat (The Disconnected Letters), chalk Arabic letters by Sen McGlinn and Wake, corrugated iron water tank, by Jeff Thomson

Detail of Huroof e Muqataat (The Disconnected Letters), chalk Arabic letters by Sen McGlinn on the inside of
Wake, corrugated iron water tank, by Jeff Thomson

I lived in Muslim-dominated neighbourhoods in the Netherlands for 19 years and worked with mosques and Muslim shop owners in relatively conservative communities in two exhibitions that I curated. These aimed at creating dialogues between contemporary art and aspects of the diversity of Islam. With this background, I started work on developing a show intended to give some insights into Islam, utilizing works by contemporary New Zealand artists as the medium. I am grateful to Wendy Harsant, then manager of NorthArt, for accepting my pitch, and to my co-curator,
Salama Moata McNamara for her help in the exhibition.
Foreground: Wake, silkscreened corrugated iron water tank, by Jeff Thomson; New Space / Takawaenga, circular floorpiece, by Ursula Christel, Talking Sticks by Carolyn Lye, Conference of Stones video and soundscape by Phil Dadson Two texts in Arabic high on the walls read, Left to Right

Click for a larger view of this image.
Foreground: Wake, silkscreened corrugated iron water tank, by Jeff Thomson; New Space / Takawaenga, circular floorpiece, by Ursula Christel; Talking Sticks by Carolyn Lye;
Conference of Stones,
video and soundscape by Phil Dadson
Two texts in Arabic high on the walls read: ﯸ ﯷ (Until you have asked permission) and above the video: ةحال (The Stones)

Some of the works by 24 artists (listed here) were aesthetic responses to the 2019 Christchurch mosque massacres while others were re-contextualizations, or responses to the Qur’an and the diverse cultures and histories of Islamic worlds. A general aim here was to include Islam in a New Zealand aesthetic landscape, and to see what changes.

I will focus here on nine works in the show, and write separate blogs on the other works in the three gallery spaces.

Conference of Stones 10 minute video and soundscape by Phil Dadson

The Arabic text above means “The Stones”
below detail of Conference of Stones,
video and soundscape by Phil Dadson
Photo: Ursula Christel


Five texts in Arabic were positioned high on the walls around the front gallery to re-contextualize the adjacent artworks. One of these texts “Hijārat” (the stones), near Phil Dadson’s video and soundpiece, “Conference of Stones” was accompanied by two excerpts from the Qur’an: “There is not an animal on earth, no bird flying on wings, but they are communities like you.” (6:38) Even the stones “fall down for fear of God” (2:74). Both texts, and the video and soundscape, bring focus to the natural world as a source for understanding. The Qur’an refers to communities in the animal world, while the reference to stones could be read as either a metaphor for the hardened self (“your hearts were hardened”, 2:74) or as the omnipotence of Allah because even stones are moved.
Conference of Stones 9 minute video and soundscape by Phil Dadson

Click for a larger view.
Still: Conference of Stones 10 minute
video and soundscape by Phil Dadson


When I first watched the video it reminded me of the poem “The conference of the birds,” by Persian Sufi poet Farid ud-Din Attar (c. 1145 – c. 1221) where diverse birds, each with a differing human-like weakness, seek to find a leader. After tests and journeys, thirty birds survive and discover that collectively their diverse traits form something greater.
Conference of Stones video and soundscape by Phil Dadson

Click for a larger view.
Still: Conference of Stones, 2013, video and soundscape,
by Phil Dadson.
Filmed in HD 1920 x 1080 digital moving image, stereo recorded with Sennheisser microphones.
Credits:
Performed by Phil Dadson
Camera by Bruce Foster
Sound recorded by John Kim
Digital video/audio by Phil Dadson
Produced with the support of Pew Charitable Trust, CNZ Arts Council of New Zealand, Colab Creative Technologies,.
Watch an exceprt of this 3 screen video on vimeo.


The ‘conference’ in the poem takes the form of journeys and challenges penned in allegory with multiple meanings, while in the video the ‘conference’ is the distinctive voices of handheld tapping stones collected by the artist from locations in diverse countries. The sonics of these stones were intended to resonate throughout the gallery like ripples and then beyond into the middle gallery to merge with the more abstracted and melodic soundscape from the third gallery, by Los Angeles based omposer and musician, Jessika Kenney.

Conference of Stones video and soundscape by Phil Dadson

Click for a larger view.
Conference of Stones, video and soundscape by Phil Dadson, Peace Flight, (far wall) Passion I and Passion III by Brenda Liddiard; A Matter of Faith, by Fiona Lee Graham; Kete Muka Tuatahi by Christina Hurihia Wirihana.

On the wall adjacent to the video, Passion I and Passion II by Brenda Liddiard function as abstract interludes in earthy tones with surfaces reminiscent of rugged landscapes. The delicate ink drawing, A Matter of Faith, by Fiona Lee Graham, of a nun engaged in hoeing seems to speak of a history of relationship with the land as does the woven kete (basket), Kete Muka Tuatahi (First Flax Fibre Basket) by Christina Hurihia Wirihana.
Passion I and Passion III by Brenda Liddiard

Click for a larger view.
Passion I and Passion III, 2010, Mixed media & collage on board, by Brenda Liddiard;
A Matter of Faith, 2020, monoprint, ink on paper, 150 x 100mm, by Fiona Lee Graham; Kete Muka Tuatahi by Christina Hurihia Wirihana.

Wirihana’s masterly work twists the flax back and forth, contrasting the dull underside against the top side of the flax to create the Inanga (whitebait) design. Like the citation in the Qur’an, the natural world is given a focus for human enlightenment. The patterns of this kete, created purely by twisting and turning, reflect the communities of tiny whitebait wriggling upstream against the odds.
Wake, corrugated iron water tank, by Jeff Thomson

Wake, silkscreened corrugated iron water tank,
by Jeff Thomson
The Arabic text on the wall beyond reads ‘The Heart’


Across from the video stands Wake, a customized mini-watertank by Jeff Thomson. The form speaks of containment, but on closer inspection it is about the impossibility of this. Numerous holes perforate the sides and bottom of the tank. These are not immediately visible because they match the silkscreened watery patterns and are therefore masked. These patterns are the ‘wake’ in the title: signs that something no longer present has passed by.
Detail of Huroof e Muqataat (The Disconnected Letters), chalk Arabic letters by Sen McGlinn inside Jeff Thomson's water tank sculpture.

Click for a larger view.
Detail of Huroof e Muqataat (The Disconnected Letters),
chalk Arabic letters by Sen McGlinn inside
Jeff Thomson’s water tank sculpture.


Inside this water tank are chalked floating Arabic letters, Huroof e Muqataat (The Disconnected Letters) by Sen McGlinn. This refers to the letter sequences called “Huroof e Muqataat” that begin 29 of the 114 chapters of the Qur’an. When reciting these Surahs (Chapters), these letters are pronounced as single letters, not formed into words. They are not semantic units of meaning but serve as sound – or as form if the person is reading – as a mystical or mysterious element to this Holy Book. McGlinn chose these letters to recontextualize this sculpture as a visualization for a sea of meaning that cannot be grasped: the ineffable. The absurdity of water containing water becomes a metaphor for the enigmatic wake left by a presence.
Detail of  Huroof e Muqataat (The Disconnected Letters), chalk Arabic letters by Sen McGlinn<br>and Wake, corrugated iron water tank, by Jeff Thomson

Detail of Huroof e Muqataat (The Disconnected Letters), chalk Arabic letters by Sen McGlinn
and Wake, corrugated iron water tank, by Jeff Thomson. Background: Conference of Stones, video and soundscape by Phil Dadson, Peace Flight, Passion I and Passion III by Brenda Liddiard;
A Matter of Faith, by Fiona Lee Graham;


Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza

Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza

Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza

Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza


The end gallery installation, Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza consists of projections of letters falling down twelve translucent columns of silk. Akin to the “Huroof e Muqataat” of the Qur’an, these letters or letter compositions do not form words. Each letter or combination becomes visible as it strikes the top folds of fabric and then descends to rest in a composition of other letters in the ancient Kufic font. This font is still used for permanent commemorative plaques and hence is generally associated with stability, the semantic and the architectural. Mirza’s use of this font as illuminated descending non-semantic form changes this context to the ephemeral, physical and conceptual. These letter-bodies are not prescriptive but are signs of the abstracted mystical or otherworldly.
Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza

Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza


Mirza is enrolled in a PhD at AUT (Auckland University of Technology) and is influenced by the 20th century Huroofiya Art Movement where Arabic calligraphy is deconstructed and abstracted from its more literal usage. Some schools within this movement also focus on symbolic meanings in the cosmos for these letters. Her interactive installations are practice-based research into philosophical notions of light, language and art and this installation is part of her research. The human presence is a vital part of this installation: the viewer is invited to move between the diaphanous columns.
Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza

Detail: Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza


Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza

Detail: Haykal Al Noor (Bodies of Light) by Narjis Mirza


Projections of these illuminated letters are intended to fall on the visitors’ bodies as well as onto the columns of delicate fabric so that the word ‘Haykal’ (Bodies) in title references both the Arabic letters and the presence of the viewer, whether as the body-self inside the installation, or as observer watching others as forms, continually shaping these projections. The bodies of the visitors complete the intention of this site-specific installation which here, exists in parallel with the soundpiece, Pamor performed and composed by Jessika Kenney. ‘Pamor’ refers to metallurgical patterns in ritual weapons. The sung syllables are abstracted from a Javanese prayer attributed to Sunan Kalijaga, one of the nine Sufis who brought Islam to Java over five centuries ago.

 

A list of the 24 artists in this exhibition | Next blog on this exhibition >>

 
About these 8 artists

Brenda Liddiard is a visual artist and singer songwriter/musician based in Auckland, Aotearoa | New Zealand. She has been exhibiting her paintings since 2008. brendaliddiard.co.nz, and is co-founder of the fundraising art organisation, Art for Change (www.artforchange.net).

Christina Hurihia Wirihana, based in the Bay of Plenty, Aotearoa | New Zealand, is a weaver of Te Arawa, Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Pikiao, Ngāti Rangiunora, Ngāti Raukawa, Tainui descent. Wirihana is the Chairperson of Te Roopu Raranga Whatu o Aotearoa (National Collective of Māori Weavers in New Zealand). In 2014 this collective of weavers exhibited 49 tukutuku panels in Kāhui Raranga: The Art of Tukutuku at Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. These panels are to be installed early 2015 at the Headquarters of the United Nations in New York. In 2003 Wirihana received Te Tohu Toi Kē from Te Waka Toi Creative New Zealand for making a positive development within Māori arts. See: wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_Wirihana

Fiona Lee Graham, based in Auckland, completed a Bachelor Degree in Design and Visual Art, majoring in Painting, at the Unitec, Auckland, in 2010. See: thegreyplace.nz/artists/fiona-lee-graham

Jessika Kenney, based in Los Angeles, U.S.A. is an experimental vocalist, composer, and teacher. She is most known for her performances of Indonesian vocal music (sindhenan), and Persian vocal music (radifs), as well as for her compositions drawing on elements of both. See her discography – jessikakenney.com

Jeff Thomson based in Helensville, Aotearoa / New Zealand is known for his sculptures and site-specific installations using corrugated iron as his main medium. His sculptures range from the well-crafted and iconic, such as his suite of New Zealand native birds, to the conceptual, such as his cut and corrugated ironing boards, or the add-ons he created for the roofs of houses scattered throughout the city of Whanganui, to the quirky, such as his water tanks, some filled with water, peep holes and motors. jeffthomson.co.nz

Narjis Mirza, born in Pakistan and now based in Sydney, Australia, is an installation artist. Her research examines the confluence of eastern philosophy with virtual reality, highlighting the transcendent philosophy of Persian philosopher Mulla Sadra (1571–1636). She completed her Master’s degree in Media and Design from Bilkent University Ankara, Turkey, after a Bachelor’s in Fine Arts with distinction at the National College of Arts in Pakistan. She is currently undertaking a PhD at the Auckland University of Technology. narjismirza.com

Phil Dadson, based in Auckland, Aotearoa / New Zealand, is a video & sound artist with a transdisciplinary practice including building and performing with experimental musical instruments, sound sculptures, digital media, music compositions, graphic scores and drawings. Moving image and foregrounding sound has been a feature of his practice since the early 70s, referencing the body, land, nature, and the human condition. He also founded the music/performance group, From Scratch (1974 – 2004). Awards & residencies include: US Fulbright 1991, NZ Arts Foundation Artist Laureate 2001, Antarctic Artist Fellowship 2003, ONZM 2005, Sankriti residency (India 2007), Artist Cinema commission 2010, Wallace Arts Trust Jury award 2011. thearts.co.nz/artists/phil-dadson

Sen McGlinn, born in Christchurch, Aotearoa / New Zealand has recently returned to live in the Far North after living in the Netherlands for almost 30 years. He has a Master’s in Islamic Studies from the University of Leiden, The Netherlands, where he is working on a PhD. He has authored and co-authored a number of books in Persian Literature & Iranian Studies. He has exhibited in sculpture parks and galleries since the early 90s. sculpturebysen.wordpress.com

To the next blog on this exhibition >>

Manners of Speaking – Te Pūkoro o Tāne

17 Feb

21 Feb – 26 March 2020
Geoff Wilson Gallery, NorthTec Campus, Whangārei, Aotearoa

Ghosts by Ashleigh Taupaki, Auckland

Ghosts photographic print by Ashleigh Taupaki. 42.0 x 59.4 cm
I te huringa kōmuri, e haramā te whenua i te kēhua
On looking back, the land was covered white with ghosts

Hauraki proverb

When we speak of the world in metaphor, not only is it more engaging, but it is a reminder that whatever we say is a translation of the worlds around us.
Over 50 works in diverse media on themes of proverbs and sayings by artists based in Aotearoa and beyond, curated by Sonja van Kerkhoff with 3rd year NorthTec year students.

Artists

Animal Picnic by Andrea Gardner

Animal Picnic, Archival Lambda print, 1 out of edition of 3
by Andrea Gardner. 82 x 57 cm
(click for a larger view)

Alicia Courtney, Moerwera, The Far North

Andrea Gardner, Whanganui

Ashleigh Taupaki, Auckland

Brenda Liddiard, Auckland

The Map of Hard Places, Mixed media on board, by Brenda Liddiard. 30 x 70 cm, 2014.

The Map of Hard Places, Mixed media on board
by Brenda Liddiard. 30 x 70 cm, 2014.

Brit Bunkley, Whanganui

Carolyn Lye,
Karetu, The Far North

Catrina Sutter,
Russell / Kororāreka

Chiara Rubino,
Matera, Italy

Cle Tukuitonga, Otangaroa, The Far North

Chiara Rubino, photographic print

Chiara Rubino, photographic print, 28 x 21 cm

Buona e’ la neve che a suo tempo viene
Good is the snow that comes in its time

Chiara Rubino photographs her home city, Matera, a UNESCO heritage city in southern Italy.

Elaina Arkeooll,
London, UK

Giacomo Silvano,
Irsina, Italy

Hilda Simetin, Auckland

Jacqueline Wassen, Maastricht,
The Netherlands

Jamie Larnach, Auckland

Jarred Taylor + others, Whangārei

Jeff Thomson, Helensville

Joas Nebe, Germany

Jeff Thomson 3 piece assemblage

Jeff Thomson, 3 piece assemblage

“There’s No Iron So Hard That Rust Won’t Fret It;
and There’s No Cloth So Fine That Moths Won’t Eat It.” Scottish Proverb

Joas Nebe, still from The Shareholder's Nightmare

Joas Nebe, still, The Shareholder´s Room, video, 3 min 45 sec

Man steigt nicht zweimal in denselben Fluß
You Cannot Step Into the Same River Twice
Heraclitus (c. 535 – c. 475 BC, Greece)

John Hoby, Millwater

John Mulholland, Warkworth

Maartje Zandboer, The Hague,
The Netherlands

Naomi Roche, Waikato

Lipika Sen & Prabhjyot Majithia, Auckland

Peter Scott, Kerikeri

Piet Nieuwland, Whangārei

Robert Brown, Whangaparaoa

Sam Melser, Auckland

Sonja van Kerkhoff, Kawakawa

Tash Nikora, Whangārei

Tracy Singer, Auckland

Ursula Christel (Mokopōpaki), Warkworth

Yllwbro Te Ara ki Rangihoua: The Way to Rangihoua, 2018 Scallop shells, brown string, moko adhesive Courtesy the artists and Mokopōpaki, Auckland

Yllwbro Te Ara ki Rangihoua: The Way to Rangihoua, 2018 Scallop shells, brown string, moko adhesive.
Courtesy the artists and Mokopōpaki, Auckland

Yllwbro (Mokopōpaki), North Island

Geoff Wilson Gallery, NorthTec, Gate 3, 51 Raumanga Valley Road, Whangarei

Opening 4-7p.m., 21 Feb 2020

open: 12 – 4 p.m. Wednesdays – Fridays,
and by appointment.

facebook event page for this exhibition

Geoff Wilson Gallery facebook page

northtec.ac.nz/geoff wilson gallery

Snap, Crackle, Pop-up – The ShutterRoom, Whangarei

17 Feb

12 Oct – 5 Nov 2019
The self-deprecating title, also a witty allusion to pop art (Roy Lichtenstein’s paintings of cartoons with speech bubbles were often onomatopoeiatic and pop art itself re-presented the ordinary and contemporary). The exhibition was a photographic project that translated the snap-shotted individual instant into the multi-medial.

Detail of Snap, Crackle, Pop-up at The Shutter Room, Whangarei

Detail of Snap, Crackle, Pop-up at The Shutter Room, Whangarei

It was also a participatory project: anyone with a smart phone and $2 was invited to add one of their snaps to the walls. A horizon line served as a visual guide but also added a level of complexity to the experience of Snap, Crackle Pop-up. Images above, below or across the line invited the viewer to read meanings into the placement and juxtapositionings – akin to how (despite our belief in our individualisms) each of us, is affected by our society.

The ShutterRoom is hardly a pop-up gallery having a stable following for over five years in its central Whangarei space directly across from the city public library. This proximity was part of the aesthetic experience created by The Shutter Room Collective curators, Heath, Leigh & Ken.

The ShutterRoom, Whangarei

Detail of one of the walls in Snap, Crackle, Pop-up,
The Shutter Room, Whangarei
Click for a larger view

The first instruction I was given was to take 30-odd steps towards the library to use the wifi access there to download the app required to print out my snapshot. Back in the gallery, the snapshot was printed and I was given pins to place it anywhere on the walls. Feeling rebellious, I pinned my image across the line then I counted only one cat and several baby photos in the 50 or more images. The open curation approach had an element of risk, especially where a broad public could easily walk in, but the eye height line appears to have encouraged a self displine in regards to the content and thoughtfulness in the total composition.

The Shutter Room Facebook page

The Poetic Condition @ NorthArt – Gallery 3

28 Nov
"HearSay," soundpiece, 2018, recording of a generated audio work, by Jonathan Reus.

Left to Right: “HearSay,” soundpiece, 2018, recording of a generated audio work, by Jonathan Reus.
Two paintings by Roger Morris. “Trope,” 2018, oil on canvas, 190 x 75 cm by Raewyn Turner and ceramic works by Jess Paraone. Two small works by Sonja van Kerkhoff. “Pandora’s Box” 5 piece suspended double side painting by Alexis Hunter.

Left to Right:  "HearSay," soundpiece, 2018, recording of a generated audio work,

Left to Right: “HearSay,” soundpiece, 2018, recording of a generated audio work, by Jonathan Reus.
“Enduring Freedom” and “‘Axis’ ONE” Oils on board by Roger Morris.

“HearSay,” was created by an algorithm which recombined recordings of news broadcasts from CNN, MSNBC and the BBC of an underground slave trade emerging in Libya as reported by CNN in October 2017. The story of the slave trade in Libya was reported through rumors and collections of stories by migrants stranded in local detention camps. This work highlights the problem of news organisations presenting images of truth when these are based on fragmented and subjective testimony.
This is one of several algorithmically generated sound works by Jonathan Reus, which explore the aesthetic elements of news broadcasts, by contrasting the authoritative voices of news reporters to witnesses, foley sounds, and background music used to enhance drama in the macro and micro sonic. A first sketch of this work was created during the Transmarcations work session in Brussels, 2017 organized by http://constantvzw.org

>"Trope," 2018, oil on canvas, 190 x 75 cm, by Raewyn Turner. "Binary investigations," 2 piece ceramic, "Binary investigations," ceramic, "Liminal," ceramic, "Binary with foundation," ceramic by Jess Paraone.

“Trope,” 2018, oil on canvas, 190 x 75 cm, by Raewyn Turner. Ceramic works by Jess Paraone.

"Binary investigations," 2 piece glazed ceramic, "Binary investigations," glazed ceramic, "Liminal," ceramic, "Binary with foundation," partially glazed ceramic by Jess Paraone.

“Binary investigations,” 2 piece glazed ceramic, “Binary investigations,” glazed ceramic, “Liminal,” ceramic, “Binary with foundation,” partially glazed ceramic by Jess Paraone (Ngāti Kawau, Kaitangata).

 
The rows of zeros and ones stamped into the slab-like “Binary series” works by Jess Paraone (Ngāti Kawau, Kaitangata) play off against expressionistic abstract colours and glazes. These numbers can be read simultaneously as abstract element and as symbol for the human or mark of the human made machine. The central piece, from the “Liminal” series is a rolled slab of black dyed raku clay and porcelain clay – materials with very different properties. The contrasting materiality (rough vs smooth, brittle vs elastic) and colours invite multiple readings on the theme of oppositions, compatibility, and diversity.

"Liminal," slip cast porcelain slab + raku clay coloured with black stain, fired to 1260 degrees celcius, "Binary with foundation," partially glazed ceramic by Jess Paraone.

“Liminal,” slip cast porcelain slab + raku clay coloured with black stain, fired to 1260 degrees celcius, “Binary with foundation,” glazed porcelain and brick by Jess Paraone. Click for a larger view.

“Liminal,” ceramic, “Binary with foundation,” partially glazed ceramic by Jess Paraone

Ceramics by Jess Paraone



 
Gallery 1 | Gallery 2

The Poetic Condition @ NorthArt – Gallery 1

8 Nov

18 Artists from Aotearoa | New Zealand and the Hague, The Netherlands:
Jess Paraone (Northland) | Brit Bunkley (Whanganui) | Virginia Guy (Northland) Alexis Hunter (London), Marianne Muggeridge (Taranaki) | Roger Morris (Taranaki) | Raewyn Turner + Brian Harris (Auckland)
Thom Vink | Jonathan Reus | Pietertje van Splunter | Sanne Maes | Channa Boon | Anne Wellmer | Martje Zandboer Sissel Marie Tonn |
Yair Callender | Sonja van Kerkhoff

Aesthetic explorations of the individual in society <br>by artists from The Hague and Aotearoa | New Zealand.

Aesthetic explorations of the individual in society
by
artists from The Hague and Aotearoa | New Zealand.
Photographs: Sen McGlinn.

"Hazzard Sheep" by Brit Bunkley (Whanganui), Still from "Een Rode Citroen" (A red lemon), 9 min 53 sec animation. Soundtrack Anne Wellmer (The Hague). Drawings: Geerten Ten Bosch. Animation Harriët van Reek

“Hazzard Sheep” by Brit Bunkley (Whanganui),
Still from “Een Rode Citroen” (A red lemon), 9 minute 53 second animation.
Soundtrack Anne Wellmer. Drawings: Geerten Ten Bosch. Animation Harriët van Reek

Foreground: "Rejoice" and right, "Hamlet" 3D plastic prints by Brit Bunkley. Ceramic vessels by Jess Paraone (Northland)

Still from “Een Rode Citroen” (A red lemon) by Anne Wellmer.
Foreground: “Rejoice” and right, “Hamlet”
3D plastic prints by Brit Bunkley.
Ceramic vessels by Jess Paraone (Northland)

"A Red Lemon" video by Anne Wellmer, "Vessel 1" + "Vessel 2" ceramic with mixed media by Jess Paraone (Northland), Photo intaglio, Emboss, Chine colle, 1/1, by Virginia Guy (Northland)

“A Red Lemon” video by Anne Wellmer, “Vessel 1” + “Vessel 2” ceramic with mixed media by Jess Paraone (Northland), Photo intaglio, Emboss, Chine colle, 1/1, by Virginia Guy (Northland)

Vox Sanguinis (Voice of the blood), 2015 1' 52” video. Video and soundtrack by Anne Wellmer. Camera: Florian Cramer. Voice: Cora Schmeiser. Music: "O rubor sanguinis" by Hildegard of Bingen. Trumpet: Heimo Wallner. Silent performer and stage design: Geerten Ten Bosch

Still: Vox Sanguinis (Voice of the blood), 2015 1′ 52”
Video and soundtrack by Anne Wellmer. Camera: Florian Cramer. Voice: Cora Schmeiser. Music: “O rubor sanguinis” by Hildegard of Bingen. Trumpet: Heimo Wallner. Silent performer and stage design: Geerten Ten Bosch.
“Vessel 1” + “Vessel 2” ceramic with mixed media by Jess Paraone
“Rejoice!” PLA plastic and paint by Brit Bunkley”

"Vessel 1" + "Vessel 2" ceramic with mixed media by Jess Paraone (Northland)

“Vessel 1” + “Vessel 2” ceramic, engraved sequences of zeros and ones, and nuts and bolts,
by Jess Paraone (Ngāti Kawau, Kaitangata)

by Anne Wellmer, "Vessel 1" + "Vessel 2" ceramic with mixed media by Jess Paraone (Northland), Photo intaglio, Emboss, Chine colle, 1/1, by Virginia Guy (Northland)

Transfusionen (Transfusions), 2015, video with sound, 2′ 43”
Soundtrack: Anne Wellmer. Hands: Geerten Ten Bosch, Voice: Cora Schmeiser. Music fragment from BLAST (2015) by Lukas Simonis. Text fragment from ‘Della Religione Christiana’ by Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499), first published in Italian in 1568. This German translation was published in ‘Das Blut: Symbolik und Magie’ (2004) by Piero Camporesi. The text tells of how witches used the blood of children to make medicine and the various uses (transfusions or transmutations) of this medicine, including the making of wine.
Two Photographic intaglio and embossed prints by Virginia Guy, Ceramic vessels by Jess Paraone, Nine prints by Sonja van Kerkhoff (The Hague / Northland)
Two sculptures by Brit Bunkley

Turangawaewae – Aotearoa – Home Photo Intaglio, Emboss, Chine colle

Detail: “Rejoice” 3D plastic print by Brit Bunkley.
“Turangawaewae – Aotearoa – Home,” Photo Intaglio, Emboss, Chine colle, multi-piece etching
by Virginia Guy.
“Child’s Play” photographic prints on dubond by Sonja van Kerkhoff
“Hamlet” 3D plastic print by Brit Bunkley.
“Apple Tree” oil on linen by Marianne Muggeridge (Taranaki).

“Turangawaewae – Aotearoa – Home,” Photo Intaglio, Emboss, Chine colle, multi-piece etching by Virginia Guy.

“Turangawaewae – Aotearoa – Home,” Photo Intaglio, Emboss, Chine colle, multi-piece etching by Virginia Guy. “Child’s Play” photographic prints on dubond by Sonja van Kerkhoff

“Apple Tree” oil on linen by Marianne Muggeridge
“Hamlet” 3D plastic print by Brit Bunkley.
“Plastic Play” 3 min stop motion animation by Pietertje van Splunter (The Hague)
“What kind of Idea” print on aluminium by Sonja van Kerkhoff

“Hamlet” 3D plastic print by Brit Bunkley.

“Hamlet” 3D plastic print by Brit Bunkley. Detail: print by Virginia Guy.

"Plastic Play" 3 min stop motion animation by Pietertje van Splunter (The Hague) <br>"What kind of Idea" print on aluminium (text excerpt from Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses) by Sonja van Kerkhoff, <br>Social Realism, PLA plastic, paint and flag by Brit Bunkley <br>The Speed of Dark,

"Plastic Play" by Pietertje van Splunter, "The Speed of Dark" by Thom Vink

“Plastic Play” by Pietertje van Splunter, “What kind of Idea” by Sonja van Kerkhoff, “Social Realism” by Brit Bunkley, “The Speed of Dark” by Thom Vink

Two plastic sculpture by Brit Bunkley, stop motion animation by Pietertje van Splunter, Architectural models by Thom Vink, Floor sculpture by Sanne Maes

Two sculptures by Brit Bunkley, stop motion animation by Pietertje van Splunter, Architectural models on shelf by Thom Vink, Floor sculpture by Sanne Maes, Two wall works by Sonja van Kerkhoff

front gallery

One corner of the front gallery

"Social Realism" by Brit Bunkley <br>"The Speed of Dark" by Thom Vink

“Social Realism” by Brit Bunkley
“The Speed of Dark” by Thom Vink

"The Speed of Dark", 3 cardboard models + shelf by Thom Vink (The Hague)

“The Speed of Dark”, 3 cardboard models + shelf by Thom Vink (The Hague)



"Metamorphosis IV" Dutch concrete and Taranaki branch, 40 x 100 x 60 cm, by Sanne Maes (The Hague)

“Metamorphosis IV” Dutch concrete and Taranaki branch, 40 x 100 x 60 cm,
by Sanne Maes (The Hague)
One of a number self-portrait explorations on the inner and outer in relation to the natural world.

“Metamorphosis IV” by Sanne Maes

“Metamorphosis IV” by Sanne Maes

"Metamorphosis IV" by Sanne Maes

“Metamorphosis IV” by Sanne Maes

<br><br> <a href="../2018.htm"><img src="../hours18/s+s+art/1015_1443c_+svk+rt+bb+rm.jpg" width="700" height="399" alt="choose another month"></a><br>"Metamorphosis IV" Dutch concrete and Taranaki branch, 40 x 100 x 60 cm, by Sanne Maes (The Hague)<br>

“A Tangled Tale,” batiked cloth strips bearing texts in Dutch, English and Maori, “Child’s Play” photographic prints by Sonja van Kerkhoff
“Take My Shoes” by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris, shoebox, electronics and video
“Ungeziefer 2” ASB plastic and paint, by Brit Bunkley
“Dark Perfume with Integrated Circuit” by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris
“MAP” by Roger Morris [ r e m o ] (Taranaki)
Small paintings by Pietertje van Splunter (The Hague)

“Take My Shoes” by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris, shoebox, electronics and video

“Take My Shoes” by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris, shoebox, electronics and video. The voice of a retired police officier plays when someone looks into the box.

Detail of "Take My Shoes" by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris showing a video, reflections of this in mirrors and figurines.

Detail of “Take My Shoes” by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris showing a video, reflections of this in mirrors and figurines.

"Ungeziefer 2" ASB plastic and paint, by Brit Bunkley. Ungeziefer (vermim. pest or unclean) refers to the main character of Kafka's novel, who had turned into a cockroach. <br>"Dark Perfume with Integrated Circuit" by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris

“Ungeziefer 2” ASB plastic and paint, by Brit Bunkley. “Ungeziefer 2” ASB plastic and paint, by Brit Bunkley. Ungeziefer (vermin, pest or unclean) refers to the main character in Kafka’s novel, The Metamorphosis (Die Verwandlung), in which a salesman awakes to find that he has metamorphosed into a monstrous vermin (“ungeheures Ungeziefer”).
“Dark Perfume with Integrated Circuit” by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris. Perfume with electronics and sensor, Omani Frankincense, costus, cocoa, civet, tea, cepes, heliotrope, pink champaca, black pepper, vetiver, pure alcohol
When the work is approached to sample the sweet perfume sealed in the flask, the electronic circuitry emits a second earthy organic odour.

"Dark Perfume with Integrated Circuit" by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris

“Dark Perfume with Integrated Circuit” by Raewyn Turner and Brian Harris

"MAP," Etching ink on original 'PHILIPS' world map by Roger Morris [ r e m o ] (Taranaki)

“MAP,” Etching ink on original ‘PHILIPS’ world map by Roger Morris [ r e m o ] (Taranaki)
A map hung in many New Zealand primary schools in the 50-70s printed by the British company, George Philip & Sons, showing the British Empire (in pink), other colonial powers & British shipping lines as they were in the late 1940s.

works by Pietertje van Splunter

Acrylic on hardboard votive like paintings by Pietertje van Splunter.
Left to Right: Speldenpop (Pincushion doll), Een Boom (One Tree), Masker (mask), Bandenman (Tyre man), Kater (male cat), Twee Spanen (Two spruce), Blikken Man (Tin man), Langhoefd (Long head)

Far wall: Photographic emulsion on shells from Zeeland by Martje Zandboer (The Hague), Te Maharatanga | The Recollection, diptyph on aluminum by Sonja van Kerkhoff Foreground, "Metamorphosis IV" by Sanne Maes.

Far wall: Photographic emulsion on shells from Zeeland by Martje Zandboer (The Hague), Te Maharatanga | The Recollection, diptyph on dubond + “Tulips from Istanbul” (suspended cast resin orange tinted forms) by Sonja van Kerkhoff
Foreground, “Metamorphosis IV” by Sanne Maes.

Photographic emulsion on shells from Zeeland by Martje Zandboer (The Hague)

Photographic emulsion on shells from Zeeland by Martje Zandboer (The Hague)

Photographic emulsion on shells from Zeeland by Martje Zandboer (The Hague)

Photographic emulsion on shells from Zeeland by Martje Zandboer (The Hague)

Photographic emulsion on shells from Zeeland by Martje Zandboer (The Hague). Here a man walks along the beach in the Hague area.

Photographic emulsion on an oyster shell from Zeeland
by Martje Zandboer.

Te Maharatanga | The Recollection, oils on dubond, diptych, each piece is 30 x 30 cm. Edition of 38.

Te Maharatanga | The Recollection, oils on dubond, diptych by Sonja van Kerkhoff.
Each piece is 30 x 30 cm. Edition of 38.
The fairytale takes a feminine point of view where the garden is a gateway for transcending social conditioning. Translation: Te Toroa Pohatu (Ngāti Apa).

Gallery 2 | Gallery 3

Met dank aan Stroom Den Haag / with thanks to STROOM The Hague for finanicial assistance as well as to NorthArt.