The T-Shirt is the medium

11 Aug
Installation of T shirts as art

Front row: Ode to the cessation of bleeding by Lesley Anne Morgan (Te Awamutu), Alternative Activities for the Addicted by Elaine Arkell (London), Love Me Knots (with twists) by Sonja van Kerkhoff (The Hague), Elephants for Peace by Elaine Arkell, T-Shirt Plastic by Maureen Baker (Whangarei Heads), Out of Sequins by Brian Harris (Auckland), De-composition (with biogradable rubberbands) by Sonja van Kerkhoff.

Te T-Shirt Show
Curated by Sonja van Kerkhoff + Virginia Guy
Hikurangi Art Station, 31 King St, Hikurangi, Northland, Aotearoa | New Zealand

detail of Te T-Shirt show, Hikurangi, New Zealand

Detail of T-Shirt Plastic by Maureen Baker (made out of fused plastic bags), Out of Sequins by Brian Harris, De-composition (with biogradable rubberbands)
by Sonja van Kerkhoff.

20 Artists:
Elaine Arkell (London, U.K.) | Maureen Baker (Whangarei Heads) | Hamish Oakley-Browne (Whangarei) | Susan Burgess (Christchurch) | Megan Corbett (Hikurangi) | Virginia Guy (Hikurangi) | Brian Harris (Auckland) | Dulcie Hering (Hikurangi) | Sen McGlinn (Kawakawa) | Lesley Anne Morgan (Te Awamutu) | Julia Newland (Whangarei Heads) | Benjamin Pittman (Hikurangi) | Lisa Ponweiser + Mt Hutt College students (Methven) | Jason Ratahi (Opunake) | Jacob Squire (Hikurangi) | Ursula Safar (Wales) | Te Kowhai Trust (Whangarei) | John Thomson (Hampshire, U.K.) | Raewyn Turner (Auckland) | Sonja van Kerkhoff (The Hague, The Netherlands) | Jacqueline Wassen (Maastricht, The Netherlands). Te shirts as the medium for an art show

detail of a T shirt by Lesley Anne Morgan

T-shirts by Lesley Anne Morgan + Elaine Arkell.
Click for a larger view.

Front row:
Ode to the cessation of bleeding by Lesley Anne Morgan. In celebration of menopause, the delicately cut out pieces were scattered on the floor underneath this. The black t-shirt behind this is ‘Arch Overload’ – Portsmouth Festival – 1990, custom made by John Thomson. (thomsonart.co.uk) and Alternative Activities for the Addicted by Elaine Arkell is next, who wrote: “Well, yes I once was a foolish smoker with teeth all stained and brown. The wrangle with nicotine was long and hard and this work came through and out of that wrangle.”

Love Me Knots (with twists) by Sonja van Kerkhoff

Love Me Knots (with twists)

The design for her shirt which features an original 1960s spirogragh drawing made as an ‘alternative activity’ for smoking and the T-shirt was created for the “Your Art Here (too)” on Camberwell Green, South London for Daniel Lehan’s Camberwell arts Week event in 2010. This T-shirt series also had an outing to Brighton with David Medella and the artists of the London Biennale for the project, Longshore Drift. The pink T-shirt, Love Me Knots (with twists) by Sonja van Kerkhoff is a play on materiality and sentiment with the row of rosebud knots at gut level.

Left to Right, 4th row from the front:

The Te T Shirt show

Click for a larger view.

Tīmatanga Kaitiaki (Protected or guided beginning, start or intro) by Jason Ratahi. A T-shirt of slogans in Māori and New Zealand English, Red by Sonja van Kerkhoff, a padded and filled T Shirt. Rabbits by Dulcie Hering. The light blue Tao Shirt by Susan Burgess has the symbol cut. The black shirt at the end of the next row is ‘seed, crop, harvest’ from the album CLAY CLASS DFA Records New York, 2012 by John Thomson, who wrote “My kinetic sculptures feature in the music videos of the U.K. band, Prinzhorn Dance School.” Next is ‘I begin I end’ What I do in between is up to me, a unique symbol screenprint by Megan Corbett while Rabbit by Dulcie Hering is a printed design sewn onto a T-Shirt.

t-shirts

Details of T-shirts by Susan Burgess + Raewyn Turner.
Click for a larger view.

Apron with anti-spasmodic, anti-arthritic, anti-rheumatic galbanum by Raewyn Turner is a blue T-shirt that was cut and resewn into the form of an apron with cloth sachet of perfume. In constrast to Raewyn’s repurposing of the T-shirt, Forget Us Not is purpose-made by Ursula + Alison for their rural gardening business which cares for the gardens of the oft ‘forgotten’ in our society: the elderly.

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From Iran with Love, Iranian artists in The Hague

8 Jul
Karim Allahkhani, Loot Desert, Iran, 2006.

Karim Allahkhani, Loot Desert, Iran, 2006. Installation of 900 flower pots growing wheat grass and 900 bowls of water. Total approximately 3000 square meters.

"The Disintegration of unity" ceramic pieces partly glazed, diameter 200 cm, as installed during the residency in the Hague.

“The Disintegration of unity” ceramic pieces partly glazed, diameter 200 cm, as installed during the residency in the Hague.

Squatting on the floor of the gallery next to his floor piece, Karim Allahkhani showed me pictures of his land art projects in Iran while I showed him pictures of my land art projects. Using googletranslate would take too long so we just switched images and gestured. He was one of the ten Iranian artists Mitra Jashni obtained visas for the week-long residency that preceded this exhibition in the Hague, Pulchri Gallery. Seven artists based in European countries, most of them also Iranian, joined these ten. The show has works by a total of 32 artists. Some could not come from Iran and a few are from other countries.
Tina Bateni (from Tehran, Iran) with her painting, Nanotechnology, acrylic on canvas, during the residency in the Hague, June 2018. Photo: Sonja van Kerkhoff

Tina Bateni (from Tehran, Iran) with her painting, Nanotechnology, acrylic on canvas, during the residency in the Hague, June 2018. Photo: Sonja van Kerkhoff

The curator, artist and gallery manager, Mitra Jashni, who left Iran for Ecuador in 2010, moved to the Netherlands in 2015. She received over 300 responses from artists in Iran to a call for this exhibition and residency in the Hague. While some of these Iranian artists have long careers, such as Karim Allahkhani who teaches at the Arts Academy in Kerman, none are international names. The show offers a taste of diverse contemporary art practices in Iran today.
Left to Right: Acrylic on canvas by Diana Valarezo (Ecuador/Belgium) “Song,” acrylic on canvas by Bahareh Aref (Iran/Hamburg) and Karim Allahkhani (Kerman, Iran) on right in discussion. photo: Sonja van Kerkhoff

Left to Right: Acrylic on canvas by Diana Valarezo (Ecuador/Belgium) “Song,” acrylic on canvas by Bahareh Aref (Iran/Hamburg), detail of “Love” acrylic on canvas by Maryam Iravani, and Karim Allahkhani (Kerman, Iran) on right in discussion. Photo: Sonja van Kerkhoff

Samira Alborzkouh, Acid Attack, oil on canvas, 140 x 160 cm

Samira Alborzkouh, Acid Attack, oil on canvas, 140 x 160 cm

Samira Alborzkouh’s subversive realist images of women wearing crash helmets engage with gender politics, such as acid attacks. She was articulate about her work, consciously using the glossy look not just to make a point about visibility and the visual but also as a means for infiltrating into Iranian galleries where hyperrealism was acceptable but politics is not.

Left to Right: Ghassal (Baptism) by Yousef Abdinejad and a detail of “The Royal Juggernaut” by Saied Khazaie, ecoline on canvas.


Manuchehr Gholami’s gouches are examples of the Negargari style while Saied Khazaie has patched past representations into a mismatch in his work “The royal juggernaut.” Yousef Abdinejad’s “Ghassal” (Baptism) is surreal and whimsical while Tina Bateni’s pop art like painting, “Nanotechnology” and her ‘Head to Toe’ portraits are socio-political comments on the wider world.
Sahar Eftekharzadeh (from Tehran, Iran) “No.11” acrylic and oil on canvas, 60 x 155 cm


Sahar Eftekharzadeh (from Tehran, Iran) “No.11” acrylic and oil on canvas, 60 x 155 cm

Sahar Eftekharzadeh’s “No.11” is part of a series of images on the multi-generational chain of motherood while the abstract made for this show by
"Love" acrylic on canvas, 100 x 100 cm, by Maryam Iravani (from Isfahan, Iran)

“Love” acrylic on canvas, 100 x 100 cm, by Maryam Iravani (from Isfahan, Iran)

Maryam Iravani simply has the title ‘Love.’

“Putting color on the face of the world” curated by Mitra Jashni
When: 16 June – 8 July 2018, open Tues-Sundays, 12-5pm, Tues-Sundays
Where: Lange Voorhout 15, The Hague
070 – 346 17 35, info@pulchri.nl
About this show on the Pulchri website.
Video introducing the artists.

Artists:
Samira Alborzkouh, Yousef Abdinejad, Karim Allahkhani, Bahareh Aref, Diana Valarezo, Tawab Safi, Salam Djaaz, Saeid Khazaie, Maryam Iravani, Tina Bateni, Claudette van De Rakt, Larissa Oksman, Manuchehr Gholami, Taha Hamed, Maryam Tavakoli, Hero Sheykholeslam, Atefeh Mohammadpour, Sanaz Ahmadi Ashestani, Zahara Sajadifar, Narges Adilipour, Mona Jafarnejad, Sahar Eftekharzadeh, Azam Eisazadeh, Nazanin Nabavi, Farnaz Karimi, Saba Soleymani, Hamed Heidari, Mehdi Noori, Afshin Bagheri, Amir Mansour Almaloo, Elmira Amirazodi, Morteza Mottaghi, Maryam Khorami, Marzieh Nazemzadeh, Leila Banki, Shadi Pahlavani.

Te T-Shirt show, Hikurangi

26 Feb

The Hikurangi Art Station
Hikurangi, Northland
3 – 31 March
Opening on 3 March, 5 p.m. Music and potluck (bring some food or drink)
Open Tues-Sunday, 10-4 pm

Curated by Virginia Guy + Sonja van Kerkhoff

Nearly everyone has worn a T-shirt and most have outgrown one. T-shirts are often used as a form of branding, advertising or the making of a statement. T-shirt as a sculpture, a painting, a poem or as a second chance? Come view an installation of lines of hanging t-shirts in the newly opened, artist-run space, The Hikurangi Art Station along with a show of prints in the other half of the gallery.

Detail of Elephants for Peace by Elaine Arkell, London, U.K.

Detail of Elephants for Peace by Elaine Arkell, London, U.K.


Some artists have responded to the T-shirt as medium such as Elaine Arkell’s “Elephants for Peace” series made for a the Ganesha art exhibition held on the streets on both sides of the border on the island of Cyprus. She made these T-shirts in 2011 to be worn by artists involved in performances on the streets. Another submission “Forget Us Not” are the work shirts of Alison and Ursula in their rural Wales gardening business which specializes in garden care for the often forgotten, the elderly.

Jason Ratahi’s submission is a statement of intent. Tīmatanga Kaitiaki (Protected or mindful beginning, start or introduction) is a T-shirt of slogans, in Māori and New Zealand English. Other artists have taken T-shirts and used them as a medium for re-shaping or re-making.

Jacqueline Wassen’s work uses the T-shirt as subject matter: she has created a paper shirt to be burned as an offering where what remains is a video documentation. More about this show is here

Engaged personal connections

12 Dec

by Brit Bunkely, Adrienne Spratt, Michelle Backhouse, Pietertje van Splunter, Edward Walton

Left to Right: St Cyricus, plastic, artificial flowers and Epoxy, 40 x 15 x 60 cm by Brit Bunkley; Netting, wire and acrylic, by Michelle Backhouse; Pouhine (red basket form), harakeke (flax), muka (flax fibre), commercial dyes. Raranga + whatu (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt; Lake Alice Water-tower, plastic, paint and artificial flowers, 60 x 12 x 12 cm, by Brit Bunkley; Into the pink, wire and acrylic, by Michelle Backhouse; Cleaning the Air, 43 sec video + Daily Dishes, 7 min 11 sec video by Pietertje van Splunter; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; From the War / No War series, six laser print on card reliefs (obliquely on the wall) by Hohepa; Kete Pingao, 20 x 10 cm, woven basket by Brenda Tuuta; Herenga rahi (Big connections/confinement), harakeke, muka, tanekaha bark and paru dyes. Raranga, whatu (Māori weaving techniques, suspended basket) by Adrienne Spratt.

The Poetic Condition was a show of multifaceted visions in diverse media on engaged personal connections with history, culture and social worlds by 13 artists based in the Hague and New Zealand.

by Brit Bunkley + Michelle Backhouse

Left to Right: St Cyricus by Brit Bunkley, Netting by Michelle Backhouse.

Brit Bunkley’s St Cyricus looks like a doll from a by gone age but is a 3D scan of a 1470-80 marble statue of the child saint by Italian Renaissance sculptor, Francesco Laurana.
Bunkley saw this statue in the Los Angeles Getty museum (view this statue) and was intrigued by the idea of a saint being a child. The story goes that in about 200-300 AD, that the child while being held by the governor (while the child’s mother, Saint Julitta, was on trial) the child stated that he was also a Christian and bit the governor. For this act of defiance the child was killed. Other stories tell of him being brutally tortured. The Renaissance artist incorporated symbols of sainthood such as the palm and laurel branches, and the cut off body suggests that he might be in a cauldron. The recasting of this in dark grey plastic with the addition of artificial flowers, makes the work an enigma because both aspects of social history (the religious and the art context of the statue at present) are simultaneously referenced and distanced.

by Edward Walton + Anne Wellmer

L to R: Een Rode Citroen (A red lemon), 2015, 9 min 53 sec., video + soundscape by Anne Wellmer; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; Lake Alice Water-tower + St Cyricus by Brit Bunkley.

Lake Alice Water-tower, from the abject history series, is another sculpture by Brit Bunkley created with 3D printer from scans of an existing structure also with a flower insert. Perhaps this work is nature vs culture, or nature out of culture. Water towers are still iconic structures in small New Zealand towns. This tower, in particular, makes reference to another aspect of New Zealand’s abject history, the infamous rural pyschiatric institution, Lake Alice. Like many New Zealand psychiatric hospitals, Lake Alice was self-sufficient, with its own farm, workshop, bakery, laundry, and fire station as well as its now questionable practices on its inmates. It closed in 1999.

The flower could be a sign that nature always endures, always has some measure of self-sufficency, while the static cultural innate object gains or loses meaning if its function is lost. However in foregrounding the materiality of these sculptures, such as details in the greyer than grey facades, he reminds us that this is still artifice, it is still plastic, and in the end this is a sculpture of oppositions that forces us to take our own stance.

by Michelle Backhouse, Edward Walton

Left to Right: Kāinga a roto (Home Within), suite of 5 videos (on laptop) by Sonja van Kerkhoff, Adumbrate No. 2, 2014, wire netting + Untitled, 2017, wire netting and building paper by Michelle Backhouse; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; Een Rode Citroen (A red lemon), 2015, animation, 9′ 53” by Anne Wellmer. Soundtrack: Anne Wellmer. Drawings: Geerten Ten Bosch. Animation: Harriët van Reek. Text excerpt from The Writing Notebooks (edited in English by Susan Sellers) by Hélène Cixous. Voice: Stephie Büttrich-Kolman.

The gallery space was dominated by Anne Wellmer’s soundscapes from her 3 videos played in a loop. Medieval chanting, whisperings in German and English, sounds, narration, instructional or provocative texts connected us with individualistic collaborative worlds. The 9 minute animation Een Rode Citroen (A red lemon), was a surreal exploration of a mutating organic inner and outer ‘strange-scape’ in which eerie sounds and the evocative text (in English) by Jewish-French, Algerian-born poststructuralist feminist, Hélène Cixous complemented biological galatical worlds.
Still from Vox Sanguinis (Voice of the blood), video and soundtrack: Anne Wellmer.

Still from Vox Sanguinis (Voice of the blood), 1’53”. Video and soundtrack: Anne Wellmer. Video and soundtrack: Anne Wellmer. Camera: Florian Cramer. Voice: Cora Schmeiser. Music: “O rubor sanguinis” by Hildegard of Bingen. Trumpet: Heimo Wallner. Silent performer and stage design: Geerten Ten Bosch


Another video Vox Sanguinis (Voice of the blood), was a teaser for the music theater performance by Cora Schmeiser with new compositions inspired by Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) by 4 Dutch composers: Giuliano Bracci, Kate Moore, Lukas Simonis, Boudewijn Tarenskeen and Aliona Yurtsevich. The sound design and live electronics were by Anne Wellmer. Vox Sanguinis toured to four cities in the Netherlands in 2015.

by Martje Zandboer, The Happiest place on earth, plastic, paint and artifical flowers by Brit Bunkley

Left to Right: Warm Memories, emulsion on five suspended teabags by Martje Zandboer; The Happiest place on earth, plastic, paint and artifical flowers, 55 x 45 x 10 cm, by Brit Bunkley; Kāinga a roto (Home Within), videos (on laptop) by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Adumbrate No. 2, 2014, wire netting + Untitled, 2017, wire netting and building paper by Michelle Backhouse; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; Transfusionen (Transfusions), 2015, video with sound, 2′ 43” by Anne Wellmer. Sound: Anne Wellmer. Hands: Geerten Ten Bosch. Voice: Cora Schmeiser. Music fragment from BLAST (2015) by Lukas Simonis. Text fragment from ‘Della Religione Christiana’ by Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499), first published in Italian in 1568. This German translation was published in ‘Das Blut: Symbolik und Magie’ (Blood: Symbolism and Magic) (2004) by Piero Camporesi; St Cyricus 3D plastic print sculpture by Brit Bunkley.

The whisperings in German in the video Transfusionen (Transfusions) spoke of medieval beliefs about witches using the blood of children to make medicine and the various uses (transfusions or transmutations) of this medicine, including the making of wine.

The sounds from these three videos were the soundscape of this show unless one put on headphones to listen to two of the other videos in the exhibition. Under two spatial abstractions of wire by Michelle Backhouse was the suite of videos, Kāinga a roto (Home Within), by Sonja van Kerkhoff (More >>) and around the corner was the 29 minute video, Et in Arcadia Ego by Channa Boon.

Sonja van Kerkhoff

Left to Right: Et in Arcadia Ego, 29 min video by Channa Boon; Love of the other, 10 cm diameter, print on aluminium by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Muka and taniko kete, harakeke muka, tanekaha bark + paru dyes. Whatu and taniko (Māori fibre and weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt; What kind of Idea, print on dubond by Sonja van Kerkhoff (More >>).

Et in Arcadia Ego was filmed in the former Soviet Union during an artists’ roadtrip. While historical events are the carrier of the film, a chess game, played by two residents of Odessa, sitting near the city’s Arcadia Beach, is the physical link connecting the different locations: the Aral Sea (Uzbekhistan), Odessa (Ukraine) and Tbilisi (Georgia). This film ends when the chess game is over, but the large-scale power game that is still being played out in the former U.S.S.R. is not over. Stalin’s cotton industries for example, founded by him in Central Asia, are still the reason why large parts of the Aral Sea are gone and the entire region is polluted. It has turned out to be the largest environmental disaster of the 20th century. In this work, Boon investigates the idea of location as a carrier of information, which any individual or being can tap into, just by being present at a given spot. Conversely, the film aims to show the system of thoughts and ideas that, throughout history, has created both the physical landscape and those who live in it; how it has affected the way they think and act; and how a collective consciousness has been formed in the past and is still being formed in the present.

Virgil’s phrase ‘Et in Arcadia Ego’ is also the title of a famous painting (1638) by Nicolas Poussin. The painting shows a group of shepherds who discover the phrase on a tomb, and so become aware of the existence of death in their Arcadian existence. This gives them the capacity to reflect and thus develop self-awareness. In this video, Boon connects this loss of innocence of the Arcadian shepherd – signifying an ideal world that is destroyed forever – with the present and past of the former Soviet Union. Hence, the phrase becomes a reference to the ideal world that Communism aimed to bring about in this region and the nostalgia that it still invokes.

paperpulp by Michelle  Backhouse, The Image (The spectacle is mesmeric in  order to be successful), silkscreen print and mixed  media + Where change is barely visible, 2008, laser print by Sonja van Kerkhoff

Left to Right: The Happiest place on earth, plastic, paint and artifical flowers by Brit Bunkley; Enclosure No. 1 wire netting + paperpulp by Michelle Backhouse; The Image (The spectacle is mesmeric in order to be successful), silkscreen print and mixed media (More >>) + Where change is barely visible, 2008, laser print by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Kete Whakairo (on table), dyed flax basket by Brenda Tuuta; Et in Arcadia Ego, 29 min video by Channa Boon.

The works surrounding this video were a pull and push on this theme of the romantic: Michelle Backhouse’s wire grid in colours that referenced nature and yet were unnatural in a formation that was both plant-like and yet inorganically abstract, woven baskets by Brenda Tuuta and Adrienne Spratt juxtaposed with works bearing politicized texts, and Brit Bunkley’s plastic model of the Disneyland castle recast as a ruin.

Left to Right: Mauri, harakeke, raranga (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt; Josephine’s Mother, print on aluminium, acrylic and varnish by Sonja van Kerkhoff (More >>); Bird of Prey, mixed media video loop by Sanne Maes; Untitled + Dark Entries, black and white photographs + The Speed of Dark, models on a shelf by Thom Vink; Warm Memories, photographic emulsion on teabags + magnets by Martje Zandboer and The Happiest place on earth, plastic, paint and artifical flowers, 55 x 45 x 10 cm, by Brit Bunkley (More >>).

by Adrienne Spratt

Left to Right: detail of Girl with Iberian Lynx by Michelle Backhouse; Oil on canvas by Edward Walton; From the War / No War series, six laser print on card reliefs, each is 10 x 15 x 2 cm, by Hohepa; Poutama (Step pattern), cylinder shaped basket + Herenga rahi (Big connections/confinement), harakeke, muka, tanekaha bark and paru dyes. Raranga, whatu (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt.

Martje Zandboer’s suspended photographic emulsion teabags, Thom Vink’s models and photographs and Sanne Maes’ mixed media video loop develop this pull and push into dialogue between the familiar and the other, estranged or mysterious. Adrienne Spratt’s basket below, reads as an empty vessel while its title alludes to a spirit filled essence.

On the other side of the gallery space are two more woven vessels by Adrienne Spratt. The enormous basket sways from numerous lines. Its title refers to both connection and enclosure.

Adrienne Spratt

Pouhine, Harakeke, muka, commercial dyes.  Raranga and whatu techniques by Adrienne Spratt.

Edward Walton’s gestural abstract paintings are like signatures or ‘nature traces’ while Michelle Backhouse’s paper pulp, building paper and mixed media, Girl with Iberian Lynx, from the species facing extinction series, references the tangible topic of environmental responsibility.

On the adjacent wall a frieze relief of reproductions of paintings from Hohepa’s War / No War series uses Maori cultural symbols as commentary issues of the day. Below this is a small purse-like open pingao (a New Zealand natuve yellow grass) basket by Brenda Tuuta.

In another corner lines flow out from the red basket, Pouhine by Adrienne Spratt, which blur its contours. The title refers to the pattern woven into the sides.

ddd

Left ot Right: Detail of Into the Pink, wire and paper pulp + Girl with Iberian Lynx by Michelle Backhouse; From the War / No War series, six laser print on card reliefs, each is 10 x 15 cm, by Hohepa; Kete Pingao, 20 x 10 cm, woven basket by Brenda Tuuta; Poutama (Step pattern), cylinder shaped basket + Herenga rahi (Big connections/confinement), harakeke, muka, tanekaha bark and paru dyes. Raranga, whatu (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt, Paewae (Threshold), aluminium print (above doorway) by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Lake Alice Water-tower, plastic sculpture by Brit Bunkley; Josephine’s Mother, print on aluminium, acrylic and varnish by Sonja van Kerkhoff; Mauri (essence/spirit), harakeke, raranga (Māori weaving techniques) by Adrienne Spratt; Detail of Bird of Prey, mixed media video loop by Sanne Maes.

Hohepa

Left to Right: From the War / No War series: Warrior with Taiaha, Patu-paiarehe lovers, black and white laser prints on card, Warrior with Taiaha, Mākutu, No more war with Taiaha laid down, Rangatahi, colour laser prints on card, each piece approx. 10 x 15 x 2 cm, by Hohepa; Kete Pingao, 20 x 10 cm, woven basket by Brenda Tuuta.

The heart of Hohepa’s work is a dialectical process – fed from his Māori heritage. He descends from the tribes: Ngāti Whakaue, Tuhourangi, Tuwharetoa ki te Aupouri, Tapu Ika, Rangitihi, Uenukukopako, Te Arawa, Ngāpuhi (Whangaroa), Ngāti Kai Tangata. These small reliefs are prints of 1 x 2 metre paintings from the War / No War series exhibited in 2017 in the Chiesa San Antonio, Lecce, a Baroque church in southern Italy.
van Splunter

Left to Right: Into the pink, wire and acrylic, by Michelle Backhouse; Detail: Lake Alice Water-tower, plastic, paint and artificial flowers by Brit Bunkley; Cleaning the Air, 43 sec video + Daily Dishes, 7 min 11 sec video by Pietertje van Splunter.

The video Cleaning the Air is actually a recording of a mobile sculpture which animates various household cleaning objects while in the video, Daily Dishes, the mundane chore of doing the dishes is turned into an animation of colour and pattern.
Still from Cleaning the Air by Pietertje van Splunter

Still from Cleaning the Air by Pietertje van Splunter.

Pietertje van Splunter’s videos are like a poetics on the mundane: housework. Her brooms seem animated by an unearthly force and the constant stacking of the differing tribes of kitchen utensils suggests a game with secret rules. In using humour with the overkill her videos are reminders that the everyday domestic, is also a microcosm of the amusing, perhaps necessary banality of habit while Michelle Backhouse’s sculptures use seemingly banal materials, building paper, netting or house paint to create ethereal protusions.

The Happiest place on earth, 3D print, by Brit Bunkley

18 Nov

The Happiest place on earth, 3D print by Brit Bunkley

The Happiest place on earth, PLA, paint and artifical flowers, 55 x 45 x 10 cm, by Brit Bunkley

<img src="https://sonjavank.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/1022_1137f_tv-bb-mz.jpg" alt="Left to Right: Photograph by Thom Vink
The Speed of Dark, 3 objects on a shelf by Thom Vink + The Happiest place on earth, 3D print by Brit Bunkley” width=”300″ height=”463″ class=”size-full wp-image-1581″ />
Left to Right: Photograph by Thom Vink
The Speed of Dark, 3 objects on a shelf by Thom Vink + The Happiest place on earth, 3D print by Brit Bunkley
  
This is one of three 3D printed architectural and cultural models from scans of actual structures combined with a bunch of artifical flowers by Brit Bunkley in this exhibition.

“The Happiest place on earth” is based the Sleeping Beauty Castle at the centre of Disneyland in California, which in turn is based on the late-19th century Neuschwanstein Castle in Bavaria, Germany.

Left to Right: Photograph by Thom Vink, The Speed of Dark, 3 objects on a shelf by Thom Vink; Warm Memories by Martje Zandboer; The Happiest place on earth, PLA, paint and artifical flowers, 55 x 45 x 10 cm, by Brit Bunkley

Left to Right: Photograph + The Speed of Dark,
3 objects on a shelf by Thom Vink
;
Warm Memories by Martje Zandboer;
The Happiest place on earth, PLA, paint and artifical flowers, 55 x 45 x 10 cm, by Brit Bunkley

Cast in a dark grey plastic as a facade with ragged edges and stuffed with a bunch of black flowers it comes across as an errie romantic ruin in miniature.

Bunkley’s series of abject sculptures are works about nature vs culture, nature out of culture and reminders of the darker side of the transcience of culture. More >>

“Peaceable Kingdom” made with Andrea Gardner is a 2017 suite of sculptures on show in the
Auckland Botanical Gardens until February 2018.

13 New Zealand and Hague Based artists in The Poetic Condition show until 10 Dec 2017 at the BackWal Gallery, 99 Atkinson Ave, Otaki.  12 Nov blog | Exhibition info | BritBunkley.com

Cameraless photography by Martje Zandboer + colonial tea-baggage

13 Nov

Left to Right: works by Sanne Maes (video + drawing) + Thom Vink (photographs + model on shelf), Martje Zandboer (emulsion on teabags), Brit Bunkley (PLA plastic and Fiberglas reinforced resin and artificial flowers)

Left to Right: works by Sanne Maes (video + drawing) + Thom Vink (photographs + model on shelf), Martje Zandboer (emulsion on teabags), Brit Bunkley (PLA plastic and Fiberglas reinforced resin and artificial flowers)

Left to Right: Detail of Thom Vink’s model on shelf, Martje Zandboer (emulsion on teabags), "The Happiest Place on Earth" by Brit Bunkley (PLA plastic and fiberglas reinforced resin and artificial flowers)

Left to Right: Detail of Thom Vink’s model on shelf, Martje Zandboer (emulsion on teabags), “The Happiest Place on Earth” by Brit Bunkley (PLA plastic and fiberglas reinforced resin and artificial flowers).

Martje Zandboer’s series 2008 “Warm Memories,” are photographic impressions from negatives that belonged to her grandmother who was born and raised in Indonesia while it was a Dutch Colony (the Dutch East Indies).

This Dutch colony was formed by the 17th century Dutch East India trading Company, which came under the administration of the Dutch government in 1800. This colony was one of the most valuable European colonies and contributed to Dutch global prominence in spice and cash crop trade in the 19th to early 20th century. The colonial social order was based on rigid racial and social structures with a Dutch elite living separate from but linked to their native subjects.

Warm Memories by Martje Zandboer

Warm Memories by Martje Zandboer


These images depict her grandmother and her husband in Indonesia from the 1920s until 1949 when she then moved to the Netherlands as did many Dutch and Indonesians when Indonesian sovereignty was finally accepted after a struggle for independence after the end of World War Two. Like many she was held in a POW camp by the Japanese.
Warm Memories, 2008, photographic emulsion on teabags held by magnets, by Martje Zandboer, The Hague , The Netherlands

Warm Memories, 2008, photographic emulsion on teabags held by magnets, by Martje Zandboer, The Hague , The Netherlands


The stains and irregularities lend a nostalgic warmth to a story mixed with suffering and change. Martje grew up hearing these bittersweet stories of her grandmother’s time in prison, followed by being forced to leave the land she was raised in.

Each teabag is suspended in space, held by a magnet. A reminder of the affects of the chances and changes of culture and times we are born into.

Martje Zandboer, a graduate of the Hague Royal Academy of Fine Arts (2005), with a Master’s in photography from Falmouth University, Cornwall, U.K. (2008), lives in The Hague, The Netherlands. Since 2006 she has taught art courses for adults and children for the city public art museum (Gemeente Museum) and the Mesdag Museum in the Hague as well as sandstone and ice sculpting for other Hague museums. Recent exhibitions are “Drawing a family around Me” at Galerie It Frysk Skildershûs in Leeuwarden (2010), The Netherlands; Eigenwijs weimar in Atelier Paul v/d Donk (2012), The Hague, and the International competition for young photographers Sotiri 2011 with her series “Intimate Propaganda: Family photographs” in Galleria ‘Guri Madhi’, Albania. Her art practice varies from the pedagogical to painting and drawing, to experimental photographic work.

Watch this space for blogs on the works by 13 New Zealand and Hague Based artists in The Poetic Condition show until 10 Dec 2017 at the BackWal Gallery, 99 Atkinson Ave, Otaki.  12 Nov blog | Exhibition info

Otaki show of diverse media: 3 of the Hague based artists

12 Nov

Left to Right: works by Sonja van Kerkhoff, Sanne Maes + Thom Vink

Left to Right: works by Sonja van Kerkhoff (print on aluminium), Sanne Maes (video + drawing) + Thom Vink (photographs + model on shelf)

Josephine’s Mother, print on aluminium and oil paint by Sonja van Kerkhoff.
The pose and composition of Josephine’s Mother is similar to the 1871 painting Whistler’s Mother where in this case, Josephine is the child the young woman is carrying. The mother looks alert and details such as a watch and the wall plug indicate that hers is a contemporary world, although she wears clothing typical of a bygone age. More >>

Still from Bird of Prey by Sanne Maes

Still from Bird of Prey by Sanne Maes

Bird of Prey, drawing on tracing paper + video, loop 0’25”, 21″ LCD tv in custom made frame by Sanne Maes
Her work consists mainly of video installations; video images (either on a monitor or projected in space) which are projected onto a drawing, a painting or an object. She uses short looped clips to create the sense of repetition in motion. In some works this creates a sense of the picturesque where images move and come to life and in other works this creates a sense of the body being locked or trapped within the drawing.
In her other works the dissonance between the still and moving images often alludes to mortality. This theme of transience and transformation is a reference to our humanity in relation to our environment – everything is linked, from micro to macro. We are all parts of the natural world. More >>
The Speed of Dark by Thom Vink

The Speed of Dark by Thom Vink


Dark Entries, black and white photograph by Thom Vink. Edition of 5.
Untitled, black and white photograph by Thom Vink. Edition of 5.
The Speed of Dark, 3 cardboard models + shelf by Thom Vink.

Thom is a graduate of the Royal Academy of the Hague School of Art (1990). In 1992 he co-founded the artist-run gallery, Quartair (www.quartair.nl). His works are poetic references to our lived-in space. Often he builds house-like models as a counterpart to his atmosperic black and white photographs. These ‘wall-based installations’ are also a play on the theme of display and objectivity. Just as in the site-specific work of Sol LeWitt, Vink has given instructions for the poetics of how his work is to be arranged, rather than specifying a particular composition. They appear as one work and yet are several works in which the boundaries are blurred. Recent exhibitions are his 2009-10 solo exhibition, MOTH HOUSE in the Hague Centre for Visual Arts and Architecture, The Netherlands, and the group exhibitions Patterns of the Mind, Turku Biennial 2011, and Limbus, Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, also in Finland. More >>

Watch this space for a daily blog on the works by 13 New Zealand and Hague Based artists in The Poetic Condition show until 10 Dec 2017 at the BackWal Gallery, 99 Atkinson Ave, Otaki.  13 Nov blog | Exhibition info